Category Archives: DW Photography

The urquhart butterfly garden

The urquhart butterfly garden

2016-08-02

Anne, Shelly, Sheri, Ingrid and Fariborz
Anne, Shelly, Sheri, Ingrid and Fariborz

 

Urquhart Butterfly Garden, Hamilton, ON L0R 2H9

Black Swallowtail and that Dam Hornet
Black Swallowtail and that Dam Hornet

Thanks to a generous grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation the old panels on the UBG kiosk have been replaced with colourful new ones.  The beautiful eye-catching new panels have been designed by Michelle Sharp

Cabbage White Butterfly
Cabbage White Butterfly

Welcome to the Urquhart Butterfly Garden, in 2016!

Chicory
Chicory

Before “we” went into the garden, Ingrid had a surprise for us all. We all participated in some stretching Exercises, a type of Meditative clearing of the mind.

Dropping all Luggage before the Grand Entrance.This was new exciting. I stepped back and took a few images, and Joined back into the Circle.

Ingrid and Shelly
Ingrid and Shelly

The five Human beings had a great day and would suggest this activity to anyone seeking Respite, relaxation, and the chance to touch Mother Nature and let her Lead the way. All five of us were well prepared and had a wonderful time, including this writer.

Our Keystone species
Our Keystone species

 

 

Join Joanne Tunnicliffe, expert Gardener and Outdoor Educator in the Urquhart Butterfly Garden’s final event of the 2015 Summer Series.  This event is particularly suitable for kids, so bring them along!

Joanne has a wealth of knowledge about the herbs and wildflowers which grow abundantly throughout the garden. In the presentation, she will discuss the qualities of the plants and the relationship that occurs between the plants and other life forms.

Silver Spotted Skipper
Silver Spotted Skipper

Joanne’s presentations are both enlightening and informative, engaging people of all ages. She is especially known for her exceptionally realistic bird calls that garner responses from nearby birds.

I was able to get 50 Raw images that represented here. Ingrid took this great image of me taking pics and give her full Credit for this Image.Thank you Ingrid Exner.

Doug Worrall
Doug Worrall

Past walks have been enlightening and have yielded sightings of magnificent butterflies such as the stunning Great Spangled Fritillary, a butterfly not commonly seen in the garden.

Although the summer is coming to an end, there are still many beautiful and fascinating species residing in the garden. Don’t miss out on this final opportunity to experience the garden to the fullest with Matt’s leadership.

Red spotted Admiral Butterfly
Red spotted Admiral Butterfly

 

Named after pioneering entomologists Dr. Frederick and Norah Urquhart,  who after forty years of patient research solved the mystery of the migrating monarchs, construction of Canada’s first municipal butterfly garden began in 1994.

Snow Berry Clear Winged Moth
Snow Berry Clear Winged Moth

Located in Centennial Park on the banks of the Desjardins Canal, it is heavily planted with nectar and foliage plants needed by butterflies and their caterpillars. It is maintained without the use of pesticides, many of which are detrimental to butterfly populations.
The garden is the brainchild of local businesswoman Joanna Chapman, who in 1992 catalyzed the formation of a group known as the “Butterfly Coalition”. Members of the Coalition secured funding, identified an appropriate site, solicited contributions in kind from many local businesses and individuals, gained the support of the Town of Dundas and devoted many hours of their own time to planting and maintaining the garden.Beyond creating valuable new butterfly habitat, the garden’s objectives include educating the public about how to contribute to protecting butterfly populations. The garden also provides a relaxing, natural environment where people of all ages can learn about the diversity of local butterfly species and enjoy their beauty.

Swamp Thistle
Swamp Thistle

The garden now consists of six large raised beds, each approximately 75 × 35 feet, and the adjacent bank of the canal. All are planted with shrubs, perennials and annuals. The Butterfly Coalition also planted ten memorial apple trees in Centennial Park, just adjacent to the garden.

Since municipal amalgamation, Dundas is now part of the City of Hamilton.

Wild Geranium
Wild Geranium

Urquhart Butterfly Garden

 

 

SOURCES, Wikipedia,  Joanne Tunnicliffe, Dundas, Hamilton and the urquhart butterfly garden.

Doug  Worrall Photography

Images by

Doug Worrall

of

DW Photography

thanks the staff and writers at Pics4twitts.com

 

 

 

 

The Sifton Bog

The Sifton Bog

London Canada

2016/06/24

Dragon Fly
Dragon Fly
Sifton Bog Environmentally Significant Area (ESA) is located on the south side of Oxford Street, west of Hyde Park Road. The map on the reverse shows the access points and trails.
Parking is available at the main entrance on Oxford Street.
The main feature of this 41.6-hectare public site is the floating acid peat bog and associated boreal plant life. Deciduous swamp and upland forest surround the bog, providing a sharp contrast between the northern (boreal) and southern (Carolinian) vegetation types.
Pitcher Plant
Pitcher Plant

Trails

There is a variety of trails within this site, totaling 2.7 km (see map on reverse). A 370-metre long boardwalk leads from the parking lot at Oxford Street to Redmond’s Pond at the centre of the bog, where there is a viewing platform. Most of the trails are easy to walk, but there are a couple of short hills. The managed trails are marked with yellow blazes.

History

Since the bog’s “discovery” by local naturalists in the 1870s, it has been a site of fascination and some controversy. In the 20th century, drainage was attempted to grow celery, layers of peat were harvested, and Black Spruce trees were sold for Christmas trees.

In 1957 a movement to preserve the bog was initiated by Dr. W.W. Judd of the University of Western Ontario. The Upper Thames River Conservation Authority acquired the site in 1967 from the Sifton Construction Company. The City of London later purchased additional lands.

Dragon Fly
Dragon Fly

Bog Formation

The bog is a product of glaciation. As the last ice sheet melted 13,000 years ago, a large block of ice broke off and settled in the glacial till (sand and gravel). When the block melted it left a kettle lake, cut off from any watercourses. Sedges, mosses and other plants gradually colonized the margins of the lake. Due to the cool, oxygen-poor conditions, when dead plants sank to the bottom, they did not break down fully, but became compressed as peat.

In time, the accumulating peat formed a semi-floating mat that crept from the outer edges of the bog towards the open water at the centre. As the mat became consolidated, Sphagnum mosses, heath plants and spruce trees grew on the drier hummocks.

Wild flowers
Wild flowers

Plant Communities

The bog’s most fascinating plant life is found near Redmond’s Pond, where colourful Sphagnum mosses grow on the surface of a quaking mat of partly decayed mosses. Other common plants include Leatherleaf, Small Cranberry, Black Huckleberry and Highbush Blueberry. Carnivorous plants such as Pitcher Plant and Round-leaved Sundew grow amongst the mosses. Orchids, including Rose Pogonia and Grass Pink, brighten the mat in early summer. In the fall, a profusion of Cotton Grass, a kind of sedge, may be seen. Towards the outer edges of the bog, Black Spruce and Tamarack trees grow.

Redmond’s Pond supports Southern Pond Lily, identified by its attractive yellow flowers and upright leaves.

Surrounding the peat bog is a swamp of Red and Silver Maple, White Pine and White Birch. There are also several small pockets of Silver Maple swamp in the southwest corner of the ESA near Naomee Place.

On the higher, drier ground surrounding the bog are trees and shrubs typical of southern Ontario’s hardwood forest. Stately White and Red Oak, Black Cherry, and Sugar Maple stand tall, overlooking the bog.

Morning refections
Morning refections

Wildlife

Numerous species of warblers, sparrows and other migrants stop over during spring and fall migration. In some years, the Black Spruce and Tamarack cones attract the winter finches.

Painted Turtles
Painted Turtles

Green Frog and Grey Treefrog are often heard in the spring. Midland Painted Turtle frequent Redmond’s Pond.

Raccoon, Grey Squirrel, Eastern Chipmunk and other mammals typical of urban natural areas can be found in the drier habitats. White-tailed Deer live in and around the ESA. The herd’s intense browsing pressure is known to result in the loss of young trees, which has a long-term impact on forest regeneration. Coyotes have also been seen and heard in the ESA.

Baby Frog
Baby Frog
FROG
FROG

Sifton Bog is home to uncommon butterflies, including the Bog Copper, whose larvae feed on cranberry plants, and the Bog Elfin, which relies on blueberry plants. Many brightly coloured dragonflies and damselflies can be seen around the pond in summer.

Colage
Colage

INFORMATION:Upper Thames Valley Conservation Authority

WIKIPEDIA

Doug Worrall Photography

DW PHOTOGRAPHY

London , Canada

Georgia Road

905 865 4034

Mother Nature and DW Photography present Summer 2016

2016-06-12

Mother Nature and DW Photography present Summer 2016

Just before the Atmospheric events began
Just before the Atmospheric events began

Last weekend a dear friend, and all around good soul and I began a journey, starting at Pinecroft -The green Tea room and the Ponds surrounding.

Abandoned
Abandoned

 

We walked/Hiked for 10 Hours, and here at Pics4twitts we have compiled some of those images

Golden Retriever
Golden Retriever

 

Wild flower Not a Nadelion
Wild flower Not a Dandelion

 

Admiral Butterfly
Admiral Butterfly

 

 

Enjoy Relax

Duck Potrait
Duck Portrait

 

Cardinal
Cardinal

 

Mother Nature is there for a reason, to See the rea; beauty in our small part of the World.

Cob-looking-proud
Cob-looking-proud

 

Bloodroot
Bloodroot

 

Living in the Middle of The Great lakes region-Southwestern Ontario Canada.

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

 

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

 

Thank you Mother Nature

 

Photos and Imagery By Doug Worrall

of DW Photography

London Canada

Call for Event, Portrait-Pet-landscape-and Images for those in the Real estate Market

PHONE:

905 865 4034–London Canada