Tag Archives: BEST PHOTOGRAPHER

The great wilderness and all her Creatures

Summer and Fall Images

November 7th, 2017

Blue Jay

 

Some of the country’s most spectacular scenery and most valuable natural and cultural treasures can be found in the National Landscape Conservation System, also known as Conservation Lands.
Autumn and the Raptor

Conservation Lands are North America’sThe newest system of conservation and are managed by Parks Canada and  Bureau of Land Management As the crown jewels of all BLM lands, the National Landscape Conservation System plays a critical role in the heritage and economies of the Southwestern Ontario Western landscape.

Flying into the sunset

Wilderness study areas

The National Conservation Lands system protects 27 million acres of the most pristine historically, culturally and ecologically significant landscapes in the Canada and United States. Wilderness Study Areas account for over 12 million acres of the Conservation Lands, the largest single type of protection designation.

Egret flying over peaceful Waters

The beauty of WSAs

Female Cardinals in their diversity and flexibility as a tool to both protect our treasured landscapes and support more sustainable applications of the traditional BLM multi-use approach to land management.

Blue Heron Almost In Flight

Wilderness Study Areas  have generally been left in a natural state and provide “outstanding opportunities for solitude or primitive and unconfined types of recreation” to   local communities,outdoor enthusiasts, sportsmen and scientists. They provide us with clean air, clean water and sustainable wildlife habitats, while simultaneously embodying the hope of stronger federal protections in the future.

Black crowned night heron Hunting

They also serve as outdoor laboratories, where conservationists and developers alike study everything from how to properly manage wild horses, to how best to allow ranching on public lands while protecting habitat.

Green Heron waiting for a Perch for breakfast

These 27 million acres of National Conservation Lands, just like Little Book Cliffs, are open to everyone and owned by every American. That, in my opinion, is the real opportunity, and their true value.

Owlet-ready to Branch–London Canada

Wilderness Study Areas are both a treasure and a tool, providing outstanding recreational opportunities with the promise of increased protections for their wilderness qualities.

Gorgeous pristine Trillium (Ontario,s Flower)

Accessibility and opportunity

“Wilderness” is not synonymous with “inaccessible”.  Anyone can discover untrammeled landscapes and outstanding recreation opportunities within Nature.

Picture this 

Wilderness sounds like this:

Gently rolling plateaus, bisected by four major canyons. It provides excellent sagebrush and pinyon-juniper habitat for around 100-150 wild horses.

A time for reflection, A time of Maturing

Sources:The Wilderness Society, Wikipedia

Hamilton Harbour at Sunrise

 

 

Thank you

Doug Worrall

and

Photographer

is

Doug Worrall

 

Whitetail Deer are becoming Hungry

WHITETAIL DEER – THE SPECIES

10/08/15

Grazing on grass
Grazing on grass

This weekend a great Friend and myself, visited a Cemetery in London Ontario, We were able to count at least 40 Bucks, does and fawns, all in the same area.As you View the images, note the distended stomachs, the ribs showing under the  fur and the wounds due to lack of variety of foods, and there increasing numbers as we as Humans encroach on there territory.

Cemetery Deer
Cemetery Deer

Enjoy the information, Deer should not eat grass, its to tough, but these whitetails were munching away for many hours as Humans we must Move UP instead of OUT Higher apartments

and if we do keep moving OUT into there territory, leave them be, go inside, safekeep your dogs, cats., close all doors, keep Garbage out of there way to stop them from returning, remember you encroached into there backyard, not vis versa, so LIVE with them peacefully.

whitetail Deer (10)

Thank you, this writer and most Humans would agree…………

Whitetails  (Odocoileus virginiansis )  have been around a long time. The species is 3½ million years old, and they are such awesomely successful survivors that they have not changed over these millions of years. They did not change because they are so well designed they did not need to.

While whitetail ancesters are not as ancient as the ancestors of other deer ( Muntjac ancestors arose in the middle of the Miocene Epoch [22–42 million years ago], while the whitetail ancestors came along in the late Pleiocene [3.4–5.2 million years ago] .) But whitetails are the oldest living deer species.

whitetail Deer (8)

The strength of the whitetail is its flexibility; they are ecological generalists, or opportunists. This means that, as a group, they can get by in all sorts of environments, different climates and temperatures; they can eat a huge variety of foods…they have been documented eating fish, dead birds and insects! Their flexibility allows them to coexist with human development; they are frequenters of farm crops and back yards, and can also be serious pests, not only agriculturally, but on the road causing car accidents and human deaths as well.

There are 37 subspecies of whitetail in North and South America (This does not include the mule deer and blacktailed deer which belong to a separate species), but DNA testing is showing that many of the deer now listed as subspecies are actually just locally adapted versions of the near-perfect original.

WHITETAIL HABITAT

whitetail Deer (7)

Whitetail like to live in the woods, dry or swampy, and the borders of woods.  And whitetail love water.  They are excellent swimmers, and will swim safely out to sea to a distance of five miles! The typical whitetail, restricted to open grass plains, would not survive.

whitetail Deer (6)

Although, to everything there are exceptions, and whitetails for example who are facing deep, obstructing snow that slows their escape, or even traps them in place, will then yard on flat, windblown prairies. They are choosing the less dangerous of two very dangerous options. Their normal way of escaping predators cannot be used in open country. When yarded up in winter the herd is preyed upon by predators, and it is mostly the young, the old and the sick on the outer edges that are the ones attacked. Hoofed animals that live out in the open, such as elk, are usually distance runners, and if they can run faster than their predators and outlast their predators, who for the most part are also good runners, they get to live another day.

A whitetail in the open though is a sitting duck for a pack of wolves, coyotes or dogs who are committed to the chase. As a group, whitetails are hiders, dodgers and sprinters, not distance runners, who like to out run and put obstacles between themselves and the predator.

The whitetail deer’s first concern is safety, so their environment must have what they need to allow them to maximize their best protection strategies. The doe with fawns is more intensely safety conscious than the buck, and a buck in rut can actually get quite stupid and forgo safety for the chance to breed. But, if the food is great, but safety is not, deer generally will shun that location in favor of a more secure place.

Individual whitetails are extremely loyal to their own territory, although they will leave it for up to several days if they are being hunted there, and they will leave it permanently if it becomes unsafe. In these cases their loyalty to their deeply ingrained anti-predator instincts win out over their attachment to the home territory. However, there are stories of whitetails that have starved rather than leave a barren home territory, in this case their attachment to their home keeps them on a doomed path to starvation.

If their habitat is invaded by competitors, like exotic deer, the whitetails compete poorly. Whitetail deer in Maryland were being pushed out by the oriental sika deer until conservation management helped them out. Overall, a specialist will out compete a generalist in an established area, but while the specialist may win the battle, the flexibility of the generalist, over the long run, lets them win the war.

WHITETAIL DIET

whitetail Deer (5)

The whitetail dietary flexibility stops at grass. They did not develop into grazers like some of the other deer species. They did not develop the special teeth or stomachs that can efficiently grind up and digest the tough fibers in grasses (like the horses and bovines did for example). The types of deer that do graze (like the axis deer) prefer to follow behind the coarse grass grazers so they can eat the new-sprouting, more tender shoots that spring up after the first “mowing”.

whitetail Deer (4)

Whitetail, like all deer, have incisor teeth (the cutting teeth in front) on only the bottom jaw, and a cartilage pad on the front of the upper jaw (They have molars on both upper and lower jaws.) This tooth pattern causes them to pull out the grass rather than to cut it like the specialized grazers do. The tender base of the grass is low in fiber, more nutritious and more digestible. So while whitetail can digest some of the grasses’ most tender shoots, overall they would not thrive on grass alone.

WHITETAIL DIGESTION

whitetail Deer (3)

When deer eat they are feeding themselves, but they are also feeding their gut microorganisms. Deer digestion is 100% dependent on them. They help break down the food, and without them the deer cannot digest. Deer are ruminants, meaning that they bring their food back up to chew it again. If a deer, or any ruminant, starves to the point of also starving off the good microorganisms, in order to survive, the deer will need to get not just food, but needs to get replacement gut flora too. Even with all the food a deer could want, it would starve to death if the gut flora is not replaced.

For their special type of digestion deer have stomachs with four sections, all in a row. The first section, the rumen, is where the food goes first after it has been chewed and swallowed. It can hold over two gallons, and this lets the deer bolt down a large amount of food if necessary so that it can quickly leave an area to return to safety. It is in the rumen that food is held to be brought up into its mouth later for rechewing, this is rumination or “chewing its cud”. The food is then ready to go to the second section of stomach, the reticulum. The real digestion takes place in the third section, the omasum. The last section of stomach is called the abomasum, and here the food is pelleted and routed for exit.

TAME WHITETAIL

whitetail Deer (2)

Whitetails are exquisite in their grace and beauty, and under special conditions, where their nature and needs are understood, they can be tamed and kept as pets. It is definitely not a commitment to be taken lightly though. Whitetail deer live 20 years or more in captivity, and have many special needs…not only to be comfortable, but to simply survive.

It is important to realize that deer are prey animals, while dogs and cats for example are predators. Deer are more like birds and horses who make their way in the world by being constantly alert and ready to take flight at the least whiff of danger. A prey animal will only turn to fight a predator as a last and most unwelcome choice. The prey animals that live the longest are the ones with the keenest senses, reflexes, wariness, brains and physical fitness. Its flight response though is what powers the frightened deer that will, in blind terror, hurl itself into a solid object, off a precipice, into fencing or other damaging situation, and kill or injure itself.

whitetail Deer (1)

A pet deer will, bit by bit, relinquish its profoundly wild instincts as it is tamed. An animal that is imprinted (using the word loosely) on humans will allow a person into its most intimate, personal space, and will allow very familiar physical contact. An animal that is merely hand-tame will allow closeness usually only to accept food or limited petting, and it would bolt off in a panic if you, for example, tried to hug it. Many wild animals’ personal spaces shrink with familiarity. They might know that a particular dog never behaves in a predatory way, and so pay little attention to it, even allowing it into it’s familiar personal space. A tolerant, pen raised deer might accept a distance of, say, 20 feet between itself and its caretaker, but have a stranger come along with the caretaker and the deer will blast off in a panic. Or, if the familiar person tries to close that 20 feet to 15 feet, the deer’s flight response will kick in with full force. Finally, a completely wild animal will have its natural, unadulterated “flight distance”. Just as humans have their own personal space that, if intruded upon, will make them feel crowded and alarmed, other species as well have their own typical distance that, if trespassed upon, will trigger flight. For the whitetail this distance is 200 feet, while for the pronghorn for example it is 500 feet.

White tail deer fawn1

Tame bucks though, because they are tame, can be killers. In the wild a buck has an intense need to preserve its own flight distance, and would not think of coming close to a human, and that is exactly what protects us. Once that need for distance is gone, the aggressive, rutting buck (even more so if a person happens to come between the buck and a doe he is courting) has no sense of needing to preserve its space, and that is when he becomes seriously dangerous.

Whitetail Deer1

sources :wikipedia/suwanneeriverranch/natureworks/whitetaileddeer

 

Photographer

Doug Worrall

 

 

HAMILTON HARBOUR FISHING DERBY 2012

HAMILTON HARBOUR FISHING DERBY

 

Friday August 10 2012

“only trace amounts of rain expected 40% chance” you will not melt

Be aware of developing Thunder/Lighting Clouds/Wind and take cover- safely

Happy fisherman

One great delight is to see a child catch his or her first fish.The achievement an fascination in there eyes is worth there weight in Gold. Prizes will be rewarded to the three biggest {weighed} fish, for each species, so this includes Carp. Weights can reach very high for these large fish.

Big Carp

The Hamilton Harbour watershed covers an area of approximately 500 square kilometres at the western edge of Lake Ontario and is a region of great physiographic diversity as a result of extensive glacial and glaciofluvial processes. The watershed can be divided into four subwatersheds which drain into Hamilton Harbour and include Spencer Creek, Grindstone Creek, North Shore and Redhill Creek subwatersheds. The watershed supports diverse fish communities and offers unique aquatic habitats to both migratory and resident fish species. The Niagara Escarpment represents the region’s most prominent geological feature with its limestone and dolomite ridge bisecting the watershed as it extends from the Niagara River to Tobermory on the Bruce Peninsula.

Rainbow trout

 

Myself will be looking for the Wolf of the Lake (The Pike )

Bob’s Pike

Fish

Children and wildlife

The wetlands function as a seasonal fish nursery for Lake Ontario, and despite the historical degradation, most historical species of fish can still be found using Cootes Paradise and in increasing numbers. As with birds and plants the location is the biodiversity hotspot for Canada with over 60 species present. Each spring thousands of spawning fish migrate in through the fishway from the harbour and lake, laying eggs and leaving shortly after, allowing the marsh to function as a giant fish hatchery.

fisherman

Annually between 5 and 20 million fish are produced for the lake depending on water levels and water pollution events. The species present reflect the degraded marsh habitat with the most common the Gizzard shad.

Rbg Fish-way escapee

Also common are night time predators species Channel Catfish and Brown Bullhead, along with invasive species such as Alewife and White Perch. Popular angling species present in limited numbers include pike, Largemouth Bass, and Yellow Perch, but the large adults are only present in the marsh during the spawning season which is closed to fishing. The spring and fall season also brings several migrating salmon and trout to the marshes main inflowing river.

Rainbow trout
Jerry’s catch

In 2007, when there was low water level in Lake Ontario and a favourable wind, all the water was pushed out of Cootes Paradise and the remaining carp swam out into Hamilton Harbour. RBG staff removed the fish gates and herded out the last of the carp, and then replaced the gates. Since then the Paradise has been relatively carp free. In the absence of these large destructive bottom feeders there is a gradual return natural native plant species populations.

Now in 2012 Cootes Paradise is threatened once again by increasing numbers of Carp and Goby fish. Goby fish is a feral species that destroys our environment.

I have images of the Goby fish so if you catch one, “Dont throw it back in water, and especially donnot use as bait . Put the fish in the garbage to save our Great lakes …..please.The Goby grow too two and a half inches long, a very destructive, invasive species are  from  illegal Ballast water dumping by Ocean Craft . Remember the Zebra Mussels?

Goby Fish two inches long

and Thanking  you in advance

Doug Worrall

Rainbow trout

Event is Date below:

The Hamilton Harbour Fishing Derby takes place this Saturday, August 11th from 8am to 12pm.  Prizes to be awarded at 1:30pm – – – THIS IS A FREE EVENT FOR ALL AGES!

Company-lets go fishing

Pier 8

47 Discovery Drive

Hamilton, ON

Check in Stations:

While you are out fishing, take your camera, you may see some wonderful animals……………………

The Fishway-Black crowned night heron

Pier 8 – Scoops Ice Cream Hut
HWT Centre – North Side
Bayfront Park Boat Launch
Fishway on Waterfront Trail
LaSalle Park Boat Launch
Marine Police Basin

3 age categories:

Child 10 and under
Youth 11 to 17
Adult 18 and over

Fishing, Environment and
Water Safety Demonstrations

_________________

1000 Free Fishing Rods for Children 12 and under

Silent Auction Fundraiser
9:00am to 1:30pm
Pier 8 – Hamilton Waterfront Trust

Harbourfront park

 

Information: Hamilton Waterfront Trust, Wikipedia

 

Photography

 

Doug Worrall