Tag Archives: Blue Jay

Blogging and Reaching the World

WHY SHOULD I BLOG?  13 Reasons WHY

Saturday November  26 2016

How Many Reasons
How Many Reasons

 

 

There are many reasons to blog, actually thirteen Reasons.For myself, it gets my Photography on the Internet–To share what I see, and how it makes me feel. If One person is pleased with my Imagery, it is well worth the work.

blue-jay-sept-16-2016-2

1. It helps you learn new things

Blogging is about sharing what you see, or want to see, in the world. It’s about teaching or sharing what you know and what you, too, are learning. When you start a blog, you’ll find yourself always learning new things about your areas of interest so you can keep sharing without running dry of ideas.

Think of it this way: when you set out to wash clothes, your objective is to clean the clothes, not your hands, but it’s your hands which become clean first

Food for thought
Food for thought

2. It makes you think clearer

The ability to think clearly and generate ideas is one of life’s most critical skills, yet one of the things you don’t get taught in school. Blogging fills that void, helping you grow your thinking muscles exponentially.

You’ll learn to reflect deeply on your life, your relationships and your society; engage with others intellectually, appreciate the strengths in arguments and point out the flaws in them; appreciate the tiny distinctions between what, why and how;the nexus and disparity between excuses and justifications, and so on.

Blue Heron
Blue Heron

3. It helps you write better

Many things have boosted my writing proficiency over the years: essay contests, tapping from mentors, reading books, etc. But none of them has challenged me so consistently as blogging.

Here’s why: writing mastery comes with constant practice and blogging is just about that. In his epic book, On Writing,  Stephen King discusses how once he didn’t write for several weeks due to an accident, and how when he started to write again, his words weren’t flowing well.

keystone-species-hostas-mm6

Keystone Species
Keystone Species

4. It builds your confidence

I used to be a timid introvert. Until I started blogging.

Blogging helps you learn to voice your opinions, dare to be wrong and stop being so scared to make mistakes. With blogging, you learn to recognize and build your strength, and also admit and improve on your weaknesses. With conversations happening on your blog, you learn to hear flattery without being carried away and take criticisms without losing your cool.

I Know I can
I Know I can

5. It helps you speak more coherently

A great speech starts with a sound script. The more you learn and share ideas about your areas of interests on your blog, the more comfortable you get discussing them verbally.

And over time, you grow confidence to face an audience and manage your nervousness on your subjects of interest. Soon, this diffuses to other verbal conversations.

RED Tailed Hawk
RED Tailed Hawk

6. It can make you money

Earning decent incomes from your blog is attainable once you create value with, and grow an audience around, it. Many big blogs make millions of dollars every year.

And me? I’m not a millionaire but I’ve made tens of thousands of dollars from blogging over the years. And I’ve done that while having ample time for my family and other engagements I enjoy.

Although I have never made any Cash from Blogging–Persistence and Patience will help , so I carry–on

Buy a boat
Buy a boat

7. It challenges you

Let’s be honest, we all need to do something challenging at some points in life. It’s easy to slide into our comfort zones and stop growing. Not with blogging though!

Although starting a blog is easy, managing it is not. Coming up with interesting ideas, interacting with readers and building a community around the blog are awesome challenges that would force you to keep learning and growing.

Robbie De Rodent
Robbie De Rodent

8. It lets you help other people

You want to inspire young people to discover and explore their true potentials? Start a blog. You want to spread the virtues of your faith? Start a blog. You wish people would make better choices in relationships and want to help them achieve that? Start a blog.

It’s happening. Ordinary people everywhere are choosing themselves to do extraordinary things in other people’s lives via a blog. You can do it too, and now’s the best time ever to start.

New Beginnings
New Beginnings

9. It disciplines you

Showing up at regular intervals is hard. Blogging helps you cultivate that discipline.

Personally, I’m Hesitant connecting with people and keeping schedules. But with my blog, I have an incentive to show up, to write and publish often, to get the job done and dismiss excuses. I’m grateful for it because it’s made me a better person.

Be Careful-Discipline
Be Careful-Discipline

10. It can promote your art or hobby

We all have things that make us tick, mine is Photography. Whether yours is writing, bead making, drawing, painting or singing, a blog can help you promote it.

Osprey in Autumn
Osprey in Autumn

11. It boosts your creativity

Blogging pushes you to be resourceful, to envision and try to create the beautiful things you want to see in the world. You imagine better, create ideas that challenge norms and share your genius with others.

That’s how to become an idea machine. And you can go ahead to give the world something essential it doesn’t know it lacks.

Sky Art
Sky Art

12. It makes you happy

Myself, I’ve found that the feeling of having inspired, helped or saved someone is what gives me the greatest joy. I’ve heard many other people say the same thing.

And since I’ve embraced blogging, it has helped me become more generous with my knowledge.

It’s a great feeling and money cannot buy it.

Sing Away
Sing Away

13. It helps you live forever

You’ve heard it before… that writing can make you live for many centuries after your death. But that’s true only if you publish your words to the world. You won’t live for long after your death if you don’t write at all, or, if you only write and file it.

Keep on Keeping ON
Keep on Keeping ON

A blog can help you build a legacy that would outlive you.

 

Information: blogonline.net

Wikipedia

 

DOUG WORRALL PHOTOGRAPHER

Wetlands – Cootes Paradise Marsh- Hamilton

History of Cootes Paradise Marsh

September 15 2013

Blue heron in flight
Blue heron in flight

 

Prior to the 20th century, the nutrient-rich, shallow waters of Cootes Paradise thrived as a coastal freshwater marsh habitat. Almost 100 percent of Cootes Paradise was covered with emergent aquatic plants like wild rice and submergent plants like wild celery, providing food, shelter and migration stop-overs for a variety of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and insects. The lush wetland also provided ideal spawning, nursery and adult habitat for many fish like bass, perch, pike, herring and trout. This lead to its protection, first as a fish sanctuary in the 1870’s, and then as a wildlife preserve in 1927, and finally through the formation of the Royal Botanical Gardens in the 1930’s.

Blue heron in flight
Blue heron in flight

The plentiful flora and fauna of Great Lakes coastal freshwater marshes did not go unnoticed by settlers in the 1800s. Cootes Paradise and its surrounding natural habitats offered abundant fishing and hunting opportunities, fertile farmland and convenient access to water. However, human settlement of Hamilton Harbour and its surrounding natural lands brought with it several Stressor’s  that, over time, had a cumulative impact on the natural abundance of Cootes Paradise and neighboring lower Grindstone Creek marshes. Throughout Cootes Paradise’s watersheds, agricultural practices and residential, commercial and industrial development contaminated connecting creeks with sewage effluent, eroded soil and sediment and chemical runoff and destabilized flow patterns. In 1852 the Desjardins Canal, a shipping channel dissecting the marsh was recut through the centre of Burlington Heights directly connecting the marsh to the lake water levels, and disconnecting it from the Grindstone Creek marshes. In 1957 the lake water level became regulated with the construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway further disrupting natural water cycles in the marsh.

Good morning
Good morning
Bee eye reflect
Bee eye reflect

Introduced European and Asian species thrived in this altered environment. Among the first non native species (1870’s) the common carp was purposely introduced as a replacement for the disappearing salmon. The feeding and spawning behaviors of non-native carp uprooted and destroyed marsh plants and re-suspended sediment muddying the waters. By the end of the 19th century, in addition to the rapidly rising carp population, exotic plant species like purple loose-strife and reed manna grass, also purposely introduced to North America, began successfully out-competing and eradicating, native plants in the wet meadow areas.

Downey Woodpecker
Downey Woodpecker
Blue Jay
Blue Jay
Natural
Natural

As human pressures on the watersheds increased, the decline in the health and biodiversity of Cootes Paradise became markedly visible. By the 1930s Cootes Paradise experienced a 15% permanent reduction in marsh vegetation, and by 1985 the level of plant loss reached 85% of its original coverage. This permanent loss of aquatic flora had a direct negative impact on water quality and the fish and wildlife inhabitants and economies of Lake Ontario. Since its dramatic decline began the Garden’s has been focused on restoring Cootes Paradise, with carp removal first attempted in the 1950’s.

Green Heron and Dinner
Green Heron and Dinner
Green Heron
Green Heron
Green Heron
Green Heron

Concerns over environmental degradation led the International Joint Commission to designate Hamilton Harbour as one of 42 Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes. In 1986, the Hamilton Harbour Remedial Action Plan was initiated to address this environmental degradation in the Harbour and key remaining areas like Cootes Paradise and lower Grindstone Creek. Under this plan, a variety of new conservation projects and monitoring programs have been implemented by a variety of stakeholders to control pollution, restore and improve fish and wildlife habitat and communicate the health status of the wetlands.

Osprey
Osprey

 

Snake
Snake

For the last four years, I have been Biking the Harbourfront trail, Hiking into Cootes Paradise and learning more each day.As you notice, the Wildlife seem’s to be getting better in our wetlands.

 

Enjoy The Images

Doug Worrall Photographer