Tag Archives: Camera Raw

WHY SHOOT RAW Control The Interpretation Of The Image

WHY SHOOT RAW
To control the interpretation of the image yourself
Friday December 3 2010
The images below are shot in srbg jpeg and using the raw manipulator.They are not raw images, All images in 2011 the originals are Raw.All the images below I chose because they were of very poor quailty and needed adjustments, some were unaffective, I like to learn from mistakes, so never delete “in camera”  Enjoy the information in this article
Doug Worrall Photographer

All Gallery’s are shot and presented in the jpeg format sRGB for best resolution on a screen Will be interesting to see the next Gallery all RAW and just RBG in 2011

Before retouching

After retouching


The answer to the above question is, simply, control over the interpretation of the image. When you shoot JPEG, the camera’s on-board software carries out all the tasks listed in the last post          “Digital Photography and Raw Images”
to produce a color image, and then compresses it using JPEG compression. Some cameras let you set parameters for this conversion—typically, a choice of sRGB or Adobe RGB (1998) as color space,a sharpness value, and perhaps a tone curve or contrast setting—but unless your shooting schedule is atypically leisurely, you probably can’t adjust these parameters on an image-by-image basis, so you’re locked into the camera’s interpretation of the scene. JPEGs offer fairly limited editing headroom—large moves to tone and color tend to exaggerate the 8-by-8-pixel blocksthat form the foundation of JPEG compression—and while JPEG does a pretty good job of preserving luminance data, it really clobbers the color,leading to problems with skin tones and gentle gradations.When you shoot raw, however, you get to control the scene interpretation through all the aforementioned aspects of the Post. With raw, the only on-camera settings that have an effect on the captured pixels are the ISO speed, shutter speed, and aperture. Everything else is under your control when you convert the raw file. You can reinterpret the white balance, the colorimetric rendering, the tonal response, and the detail rendition (sharpeningand noise reduction) with a great deal of freedom., “Exposure and Linear Capture,”you can even reinterpret the basic exposure itself, resetting the white and black points.
Before retouching
After retouching
“Most of today’s cameras capture at least 12 bits per channel per pixel, for
a possible 4,096 levels in each channel. More bits translates directly into
editing headroom, but the JPEG format is limited to 8 bits per channel per
pixel. So when you shoot JPEG, you trust the camera’s built-in conversions
to throw away one-third of your data in a way that does justice to the image.”
When you shoot raw, though, you have, by definition, captured everything
the camera can deliver, so you have much greater freedom in shaping the
overall tone and contrast for the image. You also produce a file that can
withstand a great deal more editing in Photoshop than an 8-bit-per-channel
JPEG can.
Edits in Photoshop are destructive—when you use a tool such as Levels,
Curves, Hue/Saturation, or Color Balance, you change the actual pixel
values, creating the potential for either or both of two problems:
before the clipping fixed
After clipping eradicated
• Posterization can occur when you stretch a tonal range. Where the
levels were formerly adjacent, they’re now stretched apart, so instead
of a gradation from, for example, level 100 through 101, 102, 103, 104,
to 105, the new values may look more like 98, 101, 103, 105, and 107.
On its own, such an edit is unlikely to produce visible posterization—
it usually takes a gap of four or five levels before you see a visible jump
instead of a smooth gradation—but subsequent edits can widen the
gaps, inducing posterization.
• Detail loss can occur when you compress a tonal range. Where the
levels were formerly different, they’re now compressed into the same
value, so the differences, which represent potential detail, are tossed
irrevocably into the bit bucket, never to return.
Before
After effects
The images  were transformed from a regular jpeg format using camera Raw some of the outcomes were obvious and  not good, Most “were” throw away images, but I wanted to try to see
if they could be made better.
Sorces: Wikipedia, Wowebook
Doug Worrall Photographer


All Gallery’s are shot and presented in the jpeg format sRGB for best resolution on a screen Will be interesting to see the next Gallery all RAW and just RBG in 2011

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Digital Photography and Raw Images

Digital Photography and Raw Images

Thursday December 1 2010

One of the best things about shooting raw is the freedom it confers in
imposing your preferred interpretation on your images

At the present the raw photo file is a learning curve that will only lead to better images. Below is a quote out of an ebook that basically says enough to understand
the difference of jpeg and camera raw.All my future images will be camera raw, therfore higher quality for the eye, and now I can present my Image as the best representation of my mood, and the feelings
I want to project.
This is my first try with raw and am no expert, far from-it. Computers are new to me, I have had this Digital camera  for only six months.
Enjoy the article  and hope you can try this technique.You need a fairly fast newer Computer with plenty of gigabites of ram, mine has 16 Gigs  and a Quad core.Also software
you need Creative suite 5- Photo- shop.and the software for converting the raw image.The investment is well worth the final outcome.And to be lucky to use a Nikond90 with shooting  RGB “red green blue”
and sRGB “cyans” for best monitor display therefore by default your camera will be set to sRGB ,These photos for experimental purposes shot in  adobe RGB and was a cloudy overcast day, No flash.ASA 200 and shot in aperture priority at a 9.5 F stop.
Enjoy
The  first  shots are that of a normal jpeg with the camera raw image next to-it  changing them to my liking, again, this is my first try.

cloudy day /normal jpeg
camera raw cloudy day



One of the best things about shooting raw is the freedom it confers in
imposing your preferred interpretation on your images

One of the best things about shooting raw is the freedom it confers inimposing your preferred interpretation on your images

You Have the  choice

One of the best things about shooting raw is the freedom it confers in

imposing your preferred interpretation on your images. The concomitant

downside is that if you don’t impose your preferred interpretation on the

images, you’ll have to settle for one imposed by some admittedly clever

software that is nonetheless a glorified adding machine with no knowledge

of tone and color, let alone composition, aesthetics, or emotion.

With raw capture, you have total control, and hence total responsibility.

Too many photographers wind up converting all their raw images at default

settings and then try to fix everything in Photo shop, because Photo shop is

something they know and understand.

Raw mute swans

The fact

is that Camera Raw

lets you do things that you simply cannot do in Photo shop. If you don’t use

Camera Raw to optimize your exposure and color balance, you’ll wind up

doing a lot more work in Photo shop than you need to, and the quality of the

results will almost certainly be less than you’d obtain by starting from an

optimized raw conversion rather than a default.

These second   shots are that of a normal jpeg with the camera raw image next to-it

ducks as a jpeg

camera raw ducks

Information WIKIPEDIA

Doug Worrall Photography