Tag Archives: diversity

The great wilderness and all her Creatures

Summer and Fall Images

November 7th, 2017

Blue Jay

 

Some of the country’s most spectacular scenery and most valuable natural and cultural treasures can be found in the National Landscape Conservation System, also known as Conservation Lands.
Autumn and the Raptor

Conservation Lands are North America’sThe newest system of conservation and are managed by Parks Canada and  Bureau of Land Management As the crown jewels of all BLM lands, the National Landscape Conservation System plays a critical role in the heritage and economies of the Southwestern Ontario Western landscape.

Flying into the sunset

Wilderness study areas

The National Conservation Lands system protects 27 million acres of the most pristine historically, culturally and ecologically significant landscapes in the Canada and United States. Wilderness Study Areas account for over 12 million acres of the Conservation Lands, the largest single type of protection designation.

Egret flying over peaceful Waters

The beauty of WSAs

Female Cardinals in their diversity and flexibility as a tool to both protect our treasured landscapes and support more sustainable applications of the traditional BLM multi-use approach to land management.

Blue Heron Almost In Flight

Wilderness Study Areas  have generally been left in a natural state and provide “outstanding opportunities for solitude or primitive and unconfined types of recreation” to   local communities,outdoor enthusiasts, sportsmen and scientists. They provide us with clean air, clean water and sustainable wildlife habitats, while simultaneously embodying the hope of stronger federal protections in the future.

Black crowned night heron Hunting

They also serve as outdoor laboratories, where conservationists and developers alike study everything from how to properly manage wild horses, to how best to allow ranching on public lands while protecting habitat.

Green Heron waiting for a Perch for breakfast

These 27 million acres of National Conservation Lands, just like Little Book Cliffs, are open to everyone and owned by every American. That, in my opinion, is the real opportunity, and their true value.

Owlet-ready to Branch–London Canada

Wilderness Study Areas are both a treasure and a tool, providing outstanding recreational opportunities with the promise of increased protections for their wilderness qualities.

Gorgeous pristine Trillium (Ontario,s Flower)

Accessibility and opportunity

“Wilderness” is not synonymous with “inaccessible”.  Anyone can discover untrammeled landscapes and outstanding recreation opportunities within Nature.

Picture this 

Wilderness sounds like this:

Gently rolling plateaus, bisected by four major canyons. It provides excellent sagebrush and pinyon-juniper habitat for around 100-150 wild horses.

A time for reflection, A time of Maturing

Sources:The Wilderness Society, Wikipedia

Hamilton Harbour at Sunrise

 

 

Thank you

Doug Worrall

and

Photographer

is

Doug Worrall

 

Discovering The Hendrie Valley

Discovering The Hendrie Valley

In The Mist of the morning
In The Mist of the morning
Hendrie Valley
Hendrie Valley

12/8/2013

Bee
Bee

Located on Plains Road, this thriving wetlands ecosystem is part of the Royal Botanical Gardens parklands. Free to explore, the beautiful sunny wooded trails circulate through marshes, on boardwalks and across small bridges. You’ll see chipmunks, geese, turtles and tons of birds – bring feed if you want to see them
eat out of your hand. You’ll also see just as many photographers and birders! It takes about 60-90 minutes to leisurely explore. Paid parking is in the lot across from the RBG entrance. Once there, look for the large trailhead sign that says “Cherry Hill Gate”

Cardinal
Cardinal
Female Cardinal
Female Cardinal

An area that a friend has taken me two times now and, each time we discover different trails to explore. is the Hendrie Valley Trails of the Royal Botanical Gardens.The Trails are rich with diversity,plenty of wildlife, and a pleasant quiet ,short hike.

Orchid wild
Orchid wild
Birds will eat from hands
Birds will eat from hands

A smaller scale version of Cootes Paradise, this area which includes the 100 hectare Grindstone Creek Valley stretches to the end of Carroll’s Bay and contains the finest collection of floodplain wetlands on western Lake Ontario. Transferred to the Royal Botanical Gardens in 1941 for ecological protection, the area features slopes forested with old growth trees, a 60 hectare river mouth marsh complex, and 4 creeks. Major access points are along Plains Road and include the RBG Centre and Cherry Hill Gate.

Should I or should I not
Should I or should I not
Birds dash to your hand
Birds dash to your hand

This is a great spot to see birds and assorted waterfowl. You will see in this area that a large project is underway to create new banks along the water’s edge and also provide a system that works as a natural barrier against invasive carp. This has been facilitated through the re-use of over 100,000 discarded Christmas trees.And other equally intelligent moves to keep the marsh as pristine as possible.

Wildflowers
Wildflowers
Wild Orchid
Wild Orchid
red-winged-blackbird
red-winged-blackbird

Following the trail through the Grindstone Creek Delta, you soon arrive at a spectacular boardwalk that borders Grindstone Creek providing an excellent vantage point to watch nesting birds and observe beavers and other wildlife. This is a great place to bird watch and if you bring some seed along you can have some fun feeding the friendly birds by hand.

Wildflowers
Wildflowers
On recent walks I have seen incredible amounts of red-wing blackbirds, blue jays and cardinals
Enjoy all Hamilton Has to offer.Was nice to see this fawn, he is actually in another shot, see if you can spot the fawn and Doe
Fawn Frolicking
Fawn Frolicking
Photographer
Doug Worrall
Sources:Wikipedia, Burlington Tourist,Cam Goede