Tag Archives: Doug Worrall Photographer

The urquhart butterfly garden

The urquhart butterfly garden

2016-08-02

Anne, Shelly, Sheri, Ingrid and Fariborz
Anne, Shelly, Sheri, Ingrid and Fariborz

 

Urquhart Butterfly Garden, Hamilton, ON L0R 2H9

Black Swallowtail and that Dam Hornet
Black Swallowtail and that Dam Hornet

Thanks to a generous grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation the old panels on the UBG kiosk have been replaced with colourful new ones.  The beautiful eye-catching new panels have been designed by Michelle Sharp

Cabbage White Butterfly
Cabbage White Butterfly

Welcome to the Urquhart Butterfly Garden, in 2016!

Chicory
Chicory

Before “we” went into the garden, Ingrid had a surprise for us all. We all participated in some stretching Exercises, a type of Meditative clearing of the mind.

Dropping all Luggage before the Grand Entrance.This was new exciting. I stepped back and took a few images, and Joined back into the Circle.

Ingrid and Shelly
Ingrid and Shelly

The five Human beings had a great day and would suggest this activity to anyone seeking Respite, relaxation, and the chance to touch Mother Nature and let her Lead the way. All five of us were well prepared and had a wonderful time, including this writer.

Our Keystone species
Our Keystone species

 

 

Join Joanne Tunnicliffe, expert Gardener and Outdoor Educator in the Urquhart Butterfly Garden’s final event of the 2015 Summer Series.  This event is particularly suitable for kids, so bring them along!

Joanne has a wealth of knowledge about the herbs and wildflowers which grow abundantly throughout the garden. In the presentation, she will discuss the qualities of the plants and the relationship that occurs between the plants and other life forms.

Silver Spotted Skipper
Silver Spotted Skipper

Joanne’s presentations are both enlightening and informative, engaging people of all ages. She is especially known for her exceptionally realistic bird calls that garner responses from nearby birds.

I was able to get 50 Raw images that represented here. Ingrid took this great image of me taking pics and give her full Credit for this Image.Thank you Ingrid Exner.

Doug Worrall
Doug Worrall

Past walks have been enlightening and have yielded sightings of magnificent butterflies such as the stunning Great Spangled Fritillary, a butterfly not commonly seen in the garden.

Although the summer is coming to an end, there are still many beautiful and fascinating species residing in the garden. Don’t miss out on this final opportunity to experience the garden to the fullest with Matt’s leadership.

Red spotted Admiral Butterfly
Red spotted Admiral Butterfly

 

Named after pioneering entomologists Dr. Frederick and Norah Urquhart,  who after forty years of patient research solved the mystery of the migrating monarchs, construction of Canada’s first municipal butterfly garden began in 1994.

Snow Berry Clear Winged Moth
Snow Berry Clear Winged Moth

Located in Centennial Park on the banks of the Desjardins Canal, it is heavily planted with nectar and foliage plants needed by butterflies and their caterpillars. It is maintained without the use of pesticides, many of which are detrimental to butterfly populations.
The garden is the brainchild of local businesswoman Joanna Chapman, who in 1992 catalyzed the formation of a group known as the “Butterfly Coalition”. Members of the Coalition secured funding, identified an appropriate site, solicited contributions in kind from many local businesses and individuals, gained the support of the Town of Dundas and devoted many hours of their own time to planting and maintaining the garden.Beyond creating valuable new butterfly habitat, the garden’s objectives include educating the public about how to contribute to protecting butterfly populations. The garden also provides a relaxing, natural environment where people of all ages can learn about the diversity of local butterfly species and enjoy their beauty.

Swamp Thistle
Swamp Thistle

The garden now consists of six large raised beds, each approximately 75 × 35 feet, and the adjacent bank of the canal. All are planted with shrubs, perennials and annuals. The Butterfly Coalition also planted ten memorial apple trees in Centennial Park, just adjacent to the garden.

Since municipal amalgamation, Dundas is now part of the City of Hamilton.

Wild Geranium
Wild Geranium

Urquhart Butterfly Garden

 

 

SOURCES, Wikipedia,  Joanne Tunnicliffe, Dundas, Hamilton and the urquhart butterfly garden.

Doug  Worrall Photography

Images by

Doug Worrall

of

DW Photography

thanks the staff and writers at Pics4twitts.com

 

 

 

 

Stewardship, Conservation And You

Stewardship, Conservation,  Nature and YOU

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

2016/06/30

Let us all join hands and try to make a difference

Sunrise
Sunrise

(We can divide the value that our Land have for us into three general categories: economic, ecological, and social.)

invasive plant, insect, and disease species, the need to sequester carbon, development, and so on. The need in our province for forest stewardship—wise care of and considerate use—is pressing.

Invasive
Invasive

Recycling and reusing aren’t just for hippies and environmentalists nor is it redundant .The message is that good stewardship is an agenda we can all get behind. Small changes can make a difference at a time when our planet needs a hand.

The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice
The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice

 

Humans haven’t always taken good care of Mother Nature. In the past 50 years, we’ve consumed more natural resources than in all previous history combined, according to my  Sources.

Between 1905 and 2005, global oil consumption grew eightfold, production of metals increased by 600 percent, and natural resource extraction grew by 50 percent. Today, more than 100 billion pieces of junk mail get delivered in the U.S. alone — that’s about 848 pieces per household.

WASTE
WASTE

 

Because of the burning of fossil fuels, there is now more carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere than at any other time in the last 800,000 years, according to most scientists. Increased carbon has been the driving force behind global warming, which affects nearly every ecosystem, large and small.

Fossil Fuels and YOU
Fossil Fuels and YOU

Scientists say it’s time we cleaned up our act. What better way to make a positive change . Here are 14 ways to commemorate the Earth, because Mother Nature deserves some appreciation.

1. Start a pledge board at work or at school. Use a whiteboard or provide a pad of Post-its for people to record their environmental pledges for the year. Ask friends and co-workers to make small changes — “I won’t leave the water running while I brush my teeth,” or “I will turn the lights off when I leave a room” — and then to post those pledges for all to see. Working together boosts accountability!

Accountability
Accountability

2. Attend an Earth Day fair. You’ll get the chance to test environmentally friendly products, eat locally grown food and chat with people who are making a difference when it comes to the environment.

Clean Environment
Clean Environment

 

3. Get plugged into a group. Joining an environmental group is one of the best ways to get involved in the global cleanup effort. Make a donation, put in some volunteer hours, or simply learn about the environment.

Just do it
Just do it

4. Make a recycling plan. Know what you can and cannot recycle, and start separating out those cans and bottles, Bags, plastics, paper!

Put Recycle by the curb
Put Recycle by the curb

 

5. Fix those leaky faucets. Drip, drip, DROP. You’ve put off repairing that leaky faucet project for some time now. Make a beeline for the hardware store! Only 1 percent of Earth’s water is drinkable, and our supply is slowly running out. Any should prompt you to stop wasting water and fix those leaks.

Drip Drop
Drip Drop
Leaky Faucets
Leaky Faucets

6. Plant a tree. Simple. Effective. Easy.  or Grow a Garden see #11

Plant Trees
Plant Trees

 

7. Give up bottled water. Bottled water consumes huge amounts of fossil fuels to produce and transport, and most of those recyclable water bottles end up in landfills. Get yourself a refillable and permanent water bottle to carry with you. You’ll save money on the cost of all those water bottles, too!

Bottled Water
Bottled Water

8. Start buying local. Locally grown food is easier on the environment. You’re also supporting local farmers, and they’ll thank you for it!

Buy Locally
Buy Locally

9. Go paperless. Bills come in many forms — mostly on paper. But many bill-paying services offer an option to pay online. Make a point to go paperless.

Go Paperless
Go Paperless

10. Make a birdhouse. Birdhouses can be installed around schoolyards or even sold to raise money at an environmental fundraiser.

Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy
Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy

11. Make a play garden. This is a space for kids to get their hands dirty. You can help them plant various flowers, vegetables and more. They’ll love watching them grow and tasting the fruits of their labour.

Grow a Garden
Grow a Garden

12. Write a letter to your local representative. Reaching out to elected officials and voicing your concerns over local environmental issues is one of the best ways to have your voice heard.

Let your voice be heard
Let your voice be heard

13. Organize a community cleanup. Get a group together to clean up your local park, schoolyard or beach.

Clean up after
Clean up after

14. Walk or take  Public Transportation to school. It keeps you out of the car, and it’s great exercise!

Go for walks
Go for walks

Sources:

Wikipedia,Forest Stewardship, International business and times

Thanking you all in advance

Graceful Cleaning
Graceful Cleaning

Sincerely

Yours

Conversationalist, Steward, Photographer,

Doug Worrall

DW Photography

London Ontario, Canada

Winter Photography

2016/01/20

As Seen From Above So Is Below8-001

Photography in WINTER

Autumn HamiltonM

 

Due to lack of transportation.During these cold, snowy months, I find ways to learn skills as a Photographer.

Chain of change
Chain of change

Photoshop helps me to change the look and feel of Photography.

Vegetation bleeding bush
Vegetation bleeding bush

As a naturalist, changing to much is not a good idea, so try to stay within my limits and not spend hours transforming a GRADE b image into a better one, I change a Grade a image into something Different..

Sunset-swan 3m

GERDIE
GERDIE

ENJOY

Gaggle of Ducks
Gaggle of Ducks

 

Doug