Tag Archives: dw photography

Exotic Species Are One of the Greatest Threats to the Health of the Great Lakes.

Exotic species are one of the greatest threats to the health of the Great Lakes.

FRIDAY JULY 30th 2010

Exotic species are one of the greatest threats to the health of the Great Lakes.  The  invasive  Goby fish , for example, were introduced to North America in 1991, in the St. Clair River by ballast water transfer in cargo ships.  The Goby fish is a bottom-dwelling fish with a large head and bug eyes that drives away small native fish in the Great Lakes.These exotic species also spread through personal watercraft, and, people travelling between bodies of water.

Invasion of Exotic Species is one of the most grave dangers facing the Great Lakes today. Examples of invasive exotic species in the Great Lakes include:  Asian Carp, Zebra Mussels,  GOBY fish, Sea Lamprey; and, Ruffle.  They have taken over the Great Lakes ecosystems at the expense of native species.
CORMORANTThe Cormorant  is not a  problem, in this writer’s opinion.  Anglers and commercial harvesters claim that cormorants consume large quantities of desirable fish.  Studies have repeatedly shown that in a natural environment, Cormorants feed primarily on small, largely non-commercial, shallow-water fish.  In the Great Lakes  abundant species include:  Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus); Rainbow Smelt (Osmerus mordax); and Yellow Perch (members of Percidae family – Perca flavescens).  And, birds take much smaller numbers of White Suckers (Catostomus commerson); Pumpkinseed; Crappie; Bass (Centrachidae), and Sticklebacks.
However, the Cormorant was colonized in the Great Lakes throughout the 1920s.  And, the Cormorant Population Numbers continued to increase  steadily in the 1960s.  Fish harversters in Ontario became increasingly concerned !  A recent study says, “The double-breasted Cormorant is eating more [invasive] Round Gobies and fewer sports fish.”
Researchers from 2,003 – 2,007 estimated the Cormorant ate 13 MILLION FEWER YELLOW PERCH, and, 600,000 FEWER SMALLMOUTH BASS in two large Lake Ontario Cormorant colonies.
Who ate the invasive Goby fish ?  It was the Black Waterbird, instead of the Cormorant.  This black waterbird ate more than 70 million invasive Goby fish. And, the black waterbird is called DARTER or anhinga is the common name for a very slender, black waterbird that is closely related to the Cormorant.

Hamilton Harbour
Hamilton Harbour

Research published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research shows on Pigeon and Snake islands, researchers analyzed more than 10,000 regurgitated Cormorant pellets that contained things like fish bone,  Both Pigeon and Snake islands are in the Canadian waters of Lake Ontario.  They have the second and third largest Cormorant colonies in Lake Ontario’s eastern basin.
Another 1990 study in the Journal of Great Lake Research investigated “Fish production of coastal marshes of Lake Ontario near Toronto.”  The researchers collected  of a total of 36 fish species and  approximately 23 – 27 species per marsh.  The research findings are significant as “within this collection of fish, 89% were using the marshes off the Great Lakes for reproduction. Cootes Paradise off Hamilton Harbour the location is a biodiversity hotspot for Canada with over 60 species present. Five to twenty million fish, annually, are produced for the Lake depending on water levels and water pollution events.
While ebiking around Hamilton Harbour and Cootes Paradise, I have talked to several fishermen.  Many of these fishermen, have CONCERNS about the increased Cormorant populations on Lake Ontario.  Their main concern is the double-breasted Cormorants are eating many game fish.
From what I understand, WHY the “invasion” of this fish eating bird is due to weather change, and , the amount of Goby fish in the Great lakes.  Last year, I went fishing and was able to catch Goby fish on a hook, with no bait. As soon as these Goby fish are lifted from the water they seem to rot immediately.
The Goby was introduced to the Great Lakes via bilge water from cargo ships.  Researchers at  the University of Windsor’s Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Studies stated: “The Great Lakes are among the ecosystems most altered by humans.”  Our ECOSYSTEM IS SO DELICATE, that only Mother Nature knows the best thing  to do.  MAN IS THE PROBLEM, AND MONEY, AND APATHY !

BIRDS ON A WIRE
BIRDS ON A WIRE

Goby invader
Goby invader
increasing numbers
increasing numbers
Backdrop of change
Backdrop of change
Enjoy the information and the pictures.
Doug Worrall

Nature Photography Depth of Field

Nature Photography Depth of Field

Tuesday July 20th 2010

Depth of field is something that must be considered before you snap any picture.

As I walk, my mind’s eye sees a photographic shot coming into view.  The camera is raised !  Prior to looking into the viewfinder, the picture is visualized in my mind.  When the depth of field is right, the shutter is released.  The light, reflection ,framing and contrasts determine this photographic shot.  The picture displays the way I felt at that particular MOMENT , and, THAT MOMENT IS ALL OF MY LIFE !
Below are two shots of swans

SWAN IN FOREFRONT IN FOCUS
SWAN IN FOREFRONT IN FOCUS

SWAN FURTHEST AWAY IN FOCUS
SWAN FURTHEST AWAY IN FOCUS

Village Of Coote’s Paradise
How many times have I walked these trails around Coote’s Paradise ?  …I still see, as if for the first time, the exquisite yellow light in the water and sky, in contrast to all that is blue-grey and brown. …The blue of the sky meets the yellow band that runs above the horizon.  there is a smooth transition from one to the other without a hint of green.  Life is a mystery.
– Two Sides of a Centre
Robert Clark Yates,  2001:90
Utilizing a Creuxis 1669 map, and following the massacure of the Neutral (nation) in 1650, there is no record of any more whites visiting the Dundas area until 1669.  Here, Robert Cavalier Sieur de La Salle paddled into Burlington Bay …they could see Coote’s Paradise, and the Dundas Valley from Burlington Heights.
Geological Features:  Coote’s Paradise was formed by the waters of the Erigan River. In the early 1800’s, this road activity and prospect of becoming a County Town caused William Hare to open a fourth street outside the VILLAGE OF COOTE’S PARADISE. Not until 1814 did the community take unto itself the name of Dundas.  By 1831 the population grew to 600 in Dundas, but, as the population mushroomed quickly by 1849 Dundas had 2,311 inhabitants.  Today, that population has grown ten-fold and more.
Surveyon General, D.W. Smith, said “Burlington Bay is perhaps the most beautiful and romantic a situation as any in interior Canada…particularily if we include with it a MARSHY LAKE which falls into it …called Coote’s Paradise, and abounds in game.
– The History of the Town of Dundas (1965)

REVEALING THE MAGIC ALL AROUND ME
REVEALING THE MAGIC ALL AROUND ME

Coming from a background of being a Chef and Musician, I find Photography goes hand in hand, as the rhythmic beat of the drum.  Mathematical Equations, as the notes on a Piano scale, somehow transforms the art from the eye to film.  The Chef makes a dish wich is both art and a chemical reaction.  This dish is also a variation of a mathematical equation.

Each morning there is an inner drive attracting me to Mother Nature and the OUTDOORS. In the outdoors, nature and it’s mathematical equation fuel this inner driven passion of the natural surroundings.
I do hope you enjoy the pictures today and the information
DOUG WORRALL