Tag Archives: ecosystem

Stewardship, Conservation And You

Stewardship, Conservation,  Nature and YOU

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

2016/06/30

Let us all join hands and try to make a difference

Sunrise
Sunrise

(We can divide the value that our Land have for us into three general categories: economic, ecological, and social.)

invasive plant, insect, and disease species, the need to sequester carbon, development, and so on. The need in our province for forest stewardship—wise care of and considerate use—is pressing.

Invasive
Invasive

Recycling and reusing aren’t just for hippies and environmentalists nor is it redundant .The message is that good stewardship is an agenda we can all get behind. Small changes can make a difference at a time when our planet needs a hand.

The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice
The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice

 

Humans haven’t always taken good care of Mother Nature. In the past 50 years, we’ve consumed more natural resources than in all previous history combined, according to my  Sources.

Between 1905 and 2005, global oil consumption grew eightfold, production of metals increased by 600 percent, and natural resource extraction grew by 50 percent. Today, more than 100 billion pieces of junk mail get delivered in the U.S. alone — that’s about 848 pieces per household.

WASTE
WASTE

 

Because of the burning of fossil fuels, there is now more carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere than at any other time in the last 800,000 years, according to most scientists. Increased carbon has been the driving force behind global warming, which affects nearly every ecosystem, large and small.

Fossil Fuels and YOU
Fossil Fuels and YOU

Scientists say it’s time we cleaned up our act. What better way to make a positive change . Here are 14 ways to commemorate the Earth, because Mother Nature deserves some appreciation.

1. Start a pledge board at work or at school. Use a whiteboard or provide a pad of Post-its for people to record their environmental pledges for the year. Ask friends and co-workers to make small changes — “I won’t leave the water running while I brush my teeth,” or “I will turn the lights off when I leave a room” — and then to post those pledges for all to see. Working together boosts accountability!

Accountability
Accountability

2. Attend an Earth Day fair. You’ll get the chance to test environmentally friendly products, eat locally grown food and chat with people who are making a difference when it comes to the environment.

Clean Environment
Clean Environment

 

3. Get plugged into a group. Joining an environmental group is one of the best ways to get involved in the global cleanup effort. Make a donation, put in some volunteer hours, or simply learn about the environment.

Just do it
Just do it

4. Make a recycling plan. Know what you can and cannot recycle, and start separating out those cans and bottles, Bags, plastics, paper!

Put Recycle by the curb
Put Recycle by the curb

 

5. Fix those leaky faucets. Drip, drip, DROP. You’ve put off repairing that leaky faucet project for some time now. Make a beeline for the hardware store! Only 1 percent of Earth’s water is drinkable, and our supply is slowly running out. Any should prompt you to stop wasting water and fix those leaks.

Drip Drop
Drip Drop
Leaky Faucets
Leaky Faucets

6. Plant a tree. Simple. Effective. Easy.  or Grow a Garden see #11

Plant Trees
Plant Trees

 

7. Give up bottled water. Bottled water consumes huge amounts of fossil fuels to produce and transport, and most of those recyclable water bottles end up in landfills. Get yourself a refillable and permanent water bottle to carry with you. You’ll save money on the cost of all those water bottles, too!

Bottled Water
Bottled Water

8. Start buying local. Locally grown food is easier on the environment. You’re also supporting local farmers, and they’ll thank you for it!

Buy Locally
Buy Locally

9. Go paperless. Bills come in many forms — mostly on paper. But many bill-paying services offer an option to pay online. Make a point to go paperless.

Go Paperless
Go Paperless

10. Make a birdhouse. Birdhouses can be installed around schoolyards or even sold to raise money at an environmental fundraiser.

Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy
Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy

11. Make a play garden. This is a space for kids to get their hands dirty. You can help them plant various flowers, vegetables and more. They’ll love watching them grow and tasting the fruits of their labour.

Grow a Garden
Grow a Garden

12. Write a letter to your local representative. Reaching out to elected officials and voicing your concerns over local environmental issues is one of the best ways to have your voice heard.

Let your voice be heard
Let your voice be heard

13. Organize a community cleanup. Get a group together to clean up your local park, schoolyard or beach.

Clean up after
Clean up after

14. Walk or take  Public Transportation to school. It keeps you out of the car, and it’s great exercise!

Go for walks
Go for walks

Sources:

Wikipedia,Forest Stewardship, International business and times

Thanking you all in advance

Graceful Cleaning
Graceful Cleaning

Sincerely

Yours

Conversationalist, Steward, Photographer,

Doug Worrall

DW Photography

London Ontario, Canada

Walk for our Wildlife

Walk for our Wildlife

March 4 2004

enjoy the mildness
enjoy the mildness
Tiffany Falls
Tiffany Falls

There’s no question that we lead busy lives, but how much of what we do involves physical activity? We tend to be on the go just to keep up, with grocery shopping, picking up the kids, tidying the house—and with all that hustle and bustle there doesn’t seem to be enough time left over to get outside. Walk for Wildlife -go for a walk in the cold, it feels good to get warm again.

City of waterfalls
City of waterfalls
edge
edge

The United Nations declared 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity. Biological diversity—or biodiversity—means the variety of life on earth.

Flow
Flow

 

This year, countries across the globe will join together to increase their understanding of and commitment to safeguarding the world’s biodiversity.

stroll
stroll

Canadian wildlife and wildlife habitats are feeling the impact of biodiversity loss. Climate change, habitat loss and degradation, and pollution are just some of the factors affecting our world. The woodland caribou, polar

bear and lynx are a few of our native species that are experiencing the challenges of adapting to or surviving the impacts of environmental change.

The big melt
The big melt

Now Winter is nearly over-Summer , myself cold is a difficult obstacle too overcome without a car.

Winter Stroll
Winter Stroll

 

There was a “melt” last week, here are some images-first of this year—enjoy.

 

Doug Worrall Photographer

Drought leaves Southern Ontario Thirsty

Cootes paradise our filter “Aquifer” almost dries-up
Friday September 14 2012
Dry Cootes Paradise
Thirsty for clean water
Thirsty for images
Seasons dictate life and beauty
We are heading into Autumn……………………………NOW
Another day
I hope we have not sealed our fate regarding pollution, degradation and population.  In my opinion, awareness and education do not seem to be working.  High school grads are now overweight and hooked to their cell phones, and are mostly still ignorant about their environment after years of education.  Immigrants seem to be unable to read signs that are not in their language.
As above so is below
Our water has to deal with so much.  How long can we sustain what sustains us?  If we are “what we eat,” we are full of crap ;).
Juvenile Black crowned night heron
Black crowned night heron
This year the images were hard to come by due to the lack of visible wildlife along many of our regional hiking/biking trails and conservation areas.  The City of Hamilton has outdone themselves by oiling mute swan eggs to the point that only one signet was born in Hamilton Harbour.  Still, this year was worse than all other years for e-coli bacteria.  So why do they blame the swans?  It is unwarranted and heavy handed management.  At least the RBG does not oil the eggs of mute swans.
Broad-winged Hawk
Southern Ontario Lacking Water
Continuing poor seasons threatens our way of life.
Southern Ontario’s severe weather leaves farmers with crop losses.
Water quality suffers, and all that feeds or lives from the water, which includes humans, suffer also.  Coulson said the warm spate of weather has been caused by warm fronts moving in from the southern states, which is not unusual but, because of the lack of snow, the air is not being cooled by the time it reaches Ontario.
Busy Canadian Beaver
Normally we still have snow cover over winter.  The warmer air masses, when they encounter snowpack, it modifies them and cools them off.  They would have travelled hundreds of kilometers over snow.
Monarch Butterfly

Big rain was too little, too late

Last Year -much needed water this year

Farmer Jim Vuckovic has been wishing for rain for weeks. But the way it came pouring down Sunday in a torrential storm wasn’t what he had in mind.

Great Egret with Fish

Rather than helping his dried out crops, the winds and heavy water further damaged some of his distressed corn.

Great Blue Heron

And now the 35-year-old corn, wheat and soy farmer in Beamsville finds himself contemplating one of his worst growing seasons in memory — at least with his corn fields, which are about half as high as they should be for this time of year.

Hide and seek

“I don’t ever recall it being this dry. A lot of the crops are damaged beyond saving,” says Vuckovic. “A lot of the damage is irrevocable … It’s been a bad year. Obviously, yields will be nowhere near what we’re use to.”

In Flight

Vuckovic’s farm was toured by provincial Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Minister Ted McMeekin on Tuesday.

“I saw a field of corn (Tuesday) that was clearly distressed,” McMeekin said. “The soy beans were doing OK. More importantly, the farmer was pretty distressed with the situation.”

Greater Yellowlegs

Gross Goo! Antibiotic Resistance Flourishes In Freshwater Systems

Green Antibiotic resistant -Goo
McMaster University researchers have now discovered that floc – “goo-like” substances that occur suspended in water and that host large communities of bacteria – also contain high levels of antibiotic resistance.
“This has important public health implications because the more antibiotic resistance there is, the less effective our antibiotic arsenal is against infectious diseases,” said Lesley Warren, the principal investigator for the study that looked at floc in different freshwater systems.The research was led by Warren, professor of earth sciences and Gerry Wright, scientific director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, both of McMaster, along with Ian Droppo, a research scientist at Environment Canada.

Morning flights

They examined floc collected from Hamilton Harbour, which is impacted by sewer overflow; Sunnyside Beach in Toronto, which is impacted by wastewater; a rural stream near Guelph, impacted by light agricultural activities; and a remote lake in a natural preserve area in Algonquin Park, accessible only by float plane.

One fine morning

Researchers analyzed the water and floc samples for trace element concentrations and the presence of 54 antibiotic resistant genes.

Sixteen egrets

They were surprised to discover that genes encoding resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics were present in floc bacteria at all four sites, although resistance varied in intensity based on human influence. That is, there was less antibiotic resistance detectable from Algonquin Lake compared to Hamilton Harbour, which harbored the highest concentration of floc trace elements.

“What this tells us is that antibiotic resistance is widespread in aquatic environments ranging from heavily impacted urban sites to remote areas,” said Warren. “Yet, it also demonstrates that areas with greater human impact are important reservoirs for clinically important antibiotic resistance.Floc are vibrant microbial communities that attract contaminants such as trace metals that are markers of resistance, Wright said.
Warren added the study of antibiotic resistance in floc has never been done, “and we are only scratching the surface. The presence of environmental bacterial communities in aquatic environments represents a significant, largely unknown source of antibiotic resistance,” she said. “The better we understand what is out there, the better we can develop policies to safeguard human health as best we can.”The research has been published in the science journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Funding for the study was received from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Environment Canada.

Wild Orchid

Contacts and sources:
Veronica Mcguire

McMaster University

Environment Canada.
Wikipedia
Photography
Doug Worrall
Lois Mcnaught