Tag Archives: Facts

New Images Spring 2017

New Images Spring 2017

Bird Of Prey

Coppers Hawk

1/27/17

Among the bird world’s most skillful fliers, Cooper’s Hawks are common woodland hawks that tear through cluttered tree canopies in high speed pursuit of other birds. You’re most likely to see one prowling above a forest edge or field using just a few stiff wingbeats followed by a glide. With their smaller lookalike, the Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper’s Hawks make for famously tricky identifications. Both species are sometimes unwanted guests at bird feeders, looking for an easy meal (but not one of sunflower seeds).

Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker

The active little Downy Woodpecker is a familiar sight at backyard feeders and in parks and woodlots, where it joins flocks of chickadees and nuthatches, barely outsizing them. An often acrobatic forager, this black-and-white woodpecker is at home on tiny branches or balancing on slender plant galls, sycamore seed balls, and suet feeders. Downies and their larger lookalike, the Hairy Woodpecker, are one of the first identification challenges that beginning bird watchers master.

Red Bellied Woodpecker

Red Bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are pale, medium-sized woodpeckers common in forests of the East. Their strikingly barred backs and gleaming red caps make them an unforgettable sight – just resist the temptation to call them Red-headed Woodpeckers, a somewhat rarer species that’s mostly black on the back with big white wing patches. Learn the Red-bellied’s rolling call and you’ll notice these birds everywhere.

Landscape

Sunrise over the Bay
Red Tailed hawk

RAPTORS

This is probably the most common hawk in North America. If you’ve got sharp eyes you’ll see several individuals on almost any long car ride, anywhere. Red-tailed Hawks soar above open fields, slowly turning circles on their broad, rounded wings. Other times you’ll see them atop telephone poles, eyes fixed on the ground to catch the movements of a vole or a rabbit, or simply waiting out cold weather before climbing a thermal updraft into the sky.

Bald Eagle

The Bald Eagle has been the national emblem of the United States since 1782 and a spiritual symbol for native people for far longer than that. These regal birds aren’t really bald, but their white-feathered heads gleam in contrast to their chocolate-brown body and wings. Look for them soaring in solitude, chasing other birds for their food, or gathering by the hundreds in winter. Once endangered by hunting and pesticides, Bald Eagles have flourished under protection.

WATER Birds

Common Tern

A graceful, black-and-white waterbird, the Common Tern is the most widespread tern in North America. It can be seen plunging from the air into water to catch small fish along rivers, lakes, and oceans.

 

 

Mother Nature, and, The great outdoors have many wonderful sites ,smells, sounds, textures, colours, movement it is very spiritual, and allow your senses to FEEL the Love. Stopping to smell the roses (Taking your time) and actually knowing what is happening around your Hike, or walk in the Park will sensitise,or,  help any person enjoy life just that much More, A whole bunch.

Turn your cell phone OFF. It is better to See the forest for the Trees, not the other way around If you feel you need to be “in touch” with friends, They can wait, and if you want Instant gratification–The Great Outdoors will give you that, and more. Whereas–a Cell phone can be used if it is for an Emergency.

Sometimes (mostly) I prefer to be on a Hike by myself–that way there are no interruptions, and animals are not as skittish, also the chance to get that once in a lifetime Image while alone is a Higher percentage.

Great Horned Owl

Mother Great Horned Owl

The mother, very visible, gives me Hope, and some shots to take.Presently she sits on eggs, within two Months from NOW–The owlets will be BRANCHING, Strengthening there wings.

They will be left all alone in the Nest, while Mom and Dad owl will not feed them till they fly over to them in fur trees. I pray this year, The Hoards of people, will understand that Nature, is best left out of the hands of Humans, Last year this was not the case.

 

Human Nature……………………………………………………………………………………..

 

 

Have a wonderful Year everyone

Written By Doug Worrall

 

IMAGES DOUG WORRALL

Stewardship, Conservation And You

Stewardship, Conservation,  Nature and YOU

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

2016/06/30

Let us all join hands and try to make a difference

Sunrise
Sunrise

(We can divide the value that our Land have for us into three general categories: economic, ecological, and social.)

invasive plant, insect, and disease species, the need to sequester carbon, development, and so on. The need in our province for forest stewardship—wise care of and considerate use—is pressing.

Invasive
Invasive

Recycling and reusing aren’t just for hippies and environmentalists nor is it redundant .The message is that good stewardship is an agenda we can all get behind. Small changes can make a difference at a time when our planet needs a hand.

The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice
The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice

 

Humans haven’t always taken good care of Mother Nature. In the past 50 years, we’ve consumed more natural resources than in all previous history combined, according to my  Sources.

Between 1905 and 2005, global oil consumption grew eightfold, production of metals increased by 600 percent, and natural resource extraction grew by 50 percent. Today, more than 100 billion pieces of junk mail get delivered in the U.S. alone — that’s about 848 pieces per household.

WASTE
WASTE

 

Because of the burning of fossil fuels, there is now more carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere than at any other time in the last 800,000 years, according to most scientists. Increased carbon has been the driving force behind global warming, which affects nearly every ecosystem, large and small.

Fossil Fuels and YOU
Fossil Fuels and YOU

Scientists say it’s time we cleaned up our act. What better way to make a positive change . Here are 14 ways to commemorate the Earth, because Mother Nature deserves some appreciation.

1. Start a pledge board at work or at school. Use a whiteboard or provide a pad of Post-its for people to record their environmental pledges for the year. Ask friends and co-workers to make small changes — “I won’t leave the water running while I brush my teeth,” or “I will turn the lights off when I leave a room” — and then to post those pledges for all to see. Working together boosts accountability!

Accountability
Accountability

2. Attend an Earth Day fair. You’ll get the chance to test environmentally friendly products, eat locally grown food and chat with people who are making a difference when it comes to the environment.

Clean Environment
Clean Environment

 

3. Get plugged into a group. Joining an environmental group is one of the best ways to get involved in the global cleanup effort. Make a donation, put in some volunteer hours, or simply learn about the environment.

Just do it
Just do it

4. Make a recycling plan. Know what you can and cannot recycle, and start separating out those cans and bottles, Bags, plastics, paper!

Put Recycle by the curb
Put Recycle by the curb

 

5. Fix those leaky faucets. Drip, drip, DROP. You’ve put off repairing that leaky faucet project for some time now. Make a beeline for the hardware store! Only 1 percent of Earth’s water is drinkable, and our supply is slowly running out. Any should prompt you to stop wasting water and fix those leaks.

Drip Drop
Drip Drop
Leaky Faucets
Leaky Faucets

6. Plant a tree. Simple. Effective. Easy.  or Grow a Garden see #11

Plant Trees
Plant Trees

 

7. Give up bottled water. Bottled water consumes huge amounts of fossil fuels to produce and transport, and most of those recyclable water bottles end up in landfills. Get yourself a refillable and permanent water bottle to carry with you. You’ll save money on the cost of all those water bottles, too!

Bottled Water
Bottled Water

8. Start buying local. Locally grown food is easier on the environment. You’re also supporting local farmers, and they’ll thank you for it!

Buy Locally
Buy Locally

9. Go paperless. Bills come in many forms — mostly on paper. But many bill-paying services offer an option to pay online. Make a point to go paperless.

Go Paperless
Go Paperless

10. Make a birdhouse. Birdhouses can be installed around schoolyards or even sold to raise money at an environmental fundraiser.

Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy
Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy

11. Make a play garden. This is a space for kids to get their hands dirty. You can help them plant various flowers, vegetables and more. They’ll love watching them grow and tasting the fruits of their labour.

Grow a Garden
Grow a Garden

12. Write a letter to your local representative. Reaching out to elected officials and voicing your concerns over local environmental issues is one of the best ways to have your voice heard.

Let your voice be heard
Let your voice be heard

13. Organize a community cleanup. Get a group together to clean up your local park, schoolyard or beach.

Clean up after
Clean up after

14. Walk or take  Public Transportation to school. It keeps you out of the car, and it’s great exercise!

Go for walks
Go for walks

Sources:

Wikipedia,Forest Stewardship, International business and times

Thanking you all in advance

Graceful Cleaning
Graceful Cleaning

Sincerely

Yours

Conversationalist, Steward, Photographer,

Doug Worrall

DW Photography

London Ontario, Canada

Whitetail Deer are becoming Hungry

WHITETAIL DEER – THE SPECIES

10/08/15

Grazing on grass
Grazing on grass

This weekend a great Friend and myself, visited a Cemetery in London Ontario, We were able to count at least 40 Bucks, does and fawns, all in the same area.As you View the images, note the distended stomachs, the ribs showing under the  fur and the wounds due to lack of variety of foods, and there increasing numbers as we as Humans encroach on there territory.

Cemetery Deer
Cemetery Deer

Enjoy the information, Deer should not eat grass, its to tough, but these whitetails were munching away for many hours as Humans we must Move UP instead of OUT Higher apartments

and if we do keep moving OUT into there territory, leave them be, go inside, safekeep your dogs, cats., close all doors, keep Garbage out of there way to stop them from returning, remember you encroached into there backyard, not vis versa, so LIVE with them peacefully.

whitetail Deer (10)

Thank you, this writer and most Humans would agree…………

Whitetails  (Odocoileus virginiansis )  have been around a long time. The species is 3½ million years old, and they are such awesomely successful survivors that they have not changed over these millions of years. They did not change because they are so well designed they did not need to.

While whitetail ancesters are not as ancient as the ancestors of other deer ( Muntjac ancestors arose in the middle of the Miocene Epoch [22–42 million years ago], while the whitetail ancestors came along in the late Pleiocene [3.4–5.2 million years ago] .) But whitetails are the oldest living deer species.

whitetail Deer (8)

The strength of the whitetail is its flexibility; they are ecological generalists, or opportunists. This means that, as a group, they can get by in all sorts of environments, different climates and temperatures; they can eat a huge variety of foods…they have been documented eating fish, dead birds and insects! Their flexibility allows them to coexist with human development; they are frequenters of farm crops and back yards, and can also be serious pests, not only agriculturally, but on the road causing car accidents and human deaths as well.

There are 37 subspecies of whitetail in North and South America (This does not include the mule deer and blacktailed deer which belong to a separate species), but DNA testing is showing that many of the deer now listed as subspecies are actually just locally adapted versions of the near-perfect original.

WHITETAIL HABITAT

whitetail Deer (7)

Whitetail like to live in the woods, dry or swampy, and the borders of woods.  And whitetail love water.  They are excellent swimmers, and will swim safely out to sea to a distance of five miles! The typical whitetail, restricted to open grass plains, would not survive.

whitetail Deer (6)

Although, to everything there are exceptions, and whitetails for example who are facing deep, obstructing snow that slows their escape, or even traps them in place, will then yard on flat, windblown prairies. They are choosing the less dangerous of two very dangerous options. Their normal way of escaping predators cannot be used in open country. When yarded up in winter the herd is preyed upon by predators, and it is mostly the young, the old and the sick on the outer edges that are the ones attacked. Hoofed animals that live out in the open, such as elk, are usually distance runners, and if they can run faster than their predators and outlast their predators, who for the most part are also good runners, they get to live another day.

A whitetail in the open though is a sitting duck for a pack of wolves, coyotes or dogs who are committed to the chase. As a group, whitetails are hiders, dodgers and sprinters, not distance runners, who like to out run and put obstacles between themselves and the predator.

The whitetail deer’s first concern is safety, so their environment must have what they need to allow them to maximize their best protection strategies. The doe with fawns is more intensely safety conscious than the buck, and a buck in rut can actually get quite stupid and forgo safety for the chance to breed. But, if the food is great, but safety is not, deer generally will shun that location in favor of a more secure place.

Individual whitetails are extremely loyal to their own territory, although they will leave it for up to several days if they are being hunted there, and they will leave it permanently if it becomes unsafe. In these cases their loyalty to their deeply ingrained anti-predator instincts win out over their attachment to the home territory. However, there are stories of whitetails that have starved rather than leave a barren home territory, in this case their attachment to their home keeps them on a doomed path to starvation.

If their habitat is invaded by competitors, like exotic deer, the whitetails compete poorly. Whitetail deer in Maryland were being pushed out by the oriental sika deer until conservation management helped them out. Overall, a specialist will out compete a generalist in an established area, but while the specialist may win the battle, the flexibility of the generalist, over the long run, lets them win the war.

WHITETAIL DIET

whitetail Deer (5)

The whitetail dietary flexibility stops at grass. They did not develop into grazers like some of the other deer species. They did not develop the special teeth or stomachs that can efficiently grind up and digest the tough fibers in grasses (like the horses and bovines did for example). The types of deer that do graze (like the axis deer) prefer to follow behind the coarse grass grazers so they can eat the new-sprouting, more tender shoots that spring up after the first “mowing”.

whitetail Deer (4)

Whitetail, like all deer, have incisor teeth (the cutting teeth in front) on only the bottom jaw, and a cartilage pad on the front of the upper jaw (They have molars on both upper and lower jaws.) This tooth pattern causes them to pull out the grass rather than to cut it like the specialized grazers do. The tender base of the grass is low in fiber, more nutritious and more digestible. So while whitetail can digest some of the grasses’ most tender shoots, overall they would not thrive on grass alone.

WHITETAIL DIGESTION

whitetail Deer (3)

When deer eat they are feeding themselves, but they are also feeding their gut microorganisms. Deer digestion is 100% dependent on them. They help break down the food, and without them the deer cannot digest. Deer are ruminants, meaning that they bring their food back up to chew it again. If a deer, or any ruminant, starves to the point of also starving off the good microorganisms, in order to survive, the deer will need to get not just food, but needs to get replacement gut flora too. Even with all the food a deer could want, it would starve to death if the gut flora is not replaced.

For their special type of digestion deer have stomachs with four sections, all in a row. The first section, the rumen, is where the food goes first after it has been chewed and swallowed. It can hold over two gallons, and this lets the deer bolt down a large amount of food if necessary so that it can quickly leave an area to return to safety. It is in the rumen that food is held to be brought up into its mouth later for rechewing, this is rumination or “chewing its cud”. The food is then ready to go to the second section of stomach, the reticulum. The real digestion takes place in the third section, the omasum. The last section of stomach is called the abomasum, and here the food is pelleted and routed for exit.

TAME WHITETAIL

whitetail Deer (2)

Whitetails are exquisite in their grace and beauty, and under special conditions, where their nature and needs are understood, they can be tamed and kept as pets. It is definitely not a commitment to be taken lightly though. Whitetail deer live 20 years or more in captivity, and have many special needs…not only to be comfortable, but to simply survive.

It is important to realize that deer are prey animals, while dogs and cats for example are predators. Deer are more like birds and horses who make their way in the world by being constantly alert and ready to take flight at the least whiff of danger. A prey animal will only turn to fight a predator as a last and most unwelcome choice. The prey animals that live the longest are the ones with the keenest senses, reflexes, wariness, brains and physical fitness. Its flight response though is what powers the frightened deer that will, in blind terror, hurl itself into a solid object, off a precipice, into fencing or other damaging situation, and kill or injure itself.

whitetail Deer (1)

A pet deer will, bit by bit, relinquish its profoundly wild instincts as it is tamed. An animal that is imprinted (using the word loosely) on humans will allow a person into its most intimate, personal space, and will allow very familiar physical contact. An animal that is merely hand-tame will allow closeness usually only to accept food or limited petting, and it would bolt off in a panic if you, for example, tried to hug it. Many wild animals’ personal spaces shrink with familiarity. They might know that a particular dog never behaves in a predatory way, and so pay little attention to it, even allowing it into it’s familiar personal space. A tolerant, pen raised deer might accept a distance of, say, 20 feet between itself and its caretaker, but have a stranger come along with the caretaker and the deer will blast off in a panic. Or, if the familiar person tries to close that 20 feet to 15 feet, the deer’s flight response will kick in with full force. Finally, a completely wild animal will have its natural, unadulterated “flight distance”. Just as humans have their own personal space that, if intruded upon, will make them feel crowded and alarmed, other species as well have their own typical distance that, if trespassed upon, will trigger flight. For the whitetail this distance is 200 feet, while for the pronghorn for example it is 500 feet.

White tail deer fawn1

Tame bucks though, because they are tame, can be killers. In the wild a buck has an intense need to preserve its own flight distance, and would not think of coming close to a human, and that is exactly what protects us. Once that need for distance is gone, the aggressive, rutting buck (even more so if a person happens to come between the buck and a doe he is courting) has no sense of needing to preserve its space, and that is when he becomes seriously dangerous.

Whitetail Deer1

sources :wikipedia/suwanneeriverranch/natureworks/whitetaileddeer

 

Photographer

Doug Worrall