Tag Archives: Modern science

Stewardship, Conservation And You

Stewardship, Conservation,  Nature and YOU

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

2016/06/30

Let us all join hands and try to make a difference

Sunrise
Sunrise

(We can divide the value that our Land have for us into three general categories: economic, ecological, and social.)

invasive plant, insect, and disease species, the need to sequester carbon, development, and so on. The need in our province for forest stewardship—wise care of and considerate use—is pressing.

Invasive
Invasive

Recycling and reusing aren’t just for hippies and environmentalists nor is it redundant .The message is that good stewardship is an agenda we can all get behind. Small changes can make a difference at a time when our planet needs a hand.

The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice
The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice

 

Humans haven’t always taken good care of Mother Nature. In the past 50 years, we’ve consumed more natural resources than in all previous history combined, according to my  Sources.

Between 1905 and 2005, global oil consumption grew eightfold, production of metals increased by 600 percent, and natural resource extraction grew by 50 percent. Today, more than 100 billion pieces of junk mail get delivered in the U.S. alone — that’s about 848 pieces per household.

WASTE
WASTE

 

Because of the burning of fossil fuels, there is now more carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere than at any other time in the last 800,000 years, according to most scientists. Increased carbon has been the driving force behind global warming, which affects nearly every ecosystem, large and small.

Fossil Fuels and YOU
Fossil Fuels and YOU

Scientists say it’s time we cleaned up our act. What better way to make a positive change . Here are 14 ways to commemorate the Earth, because Mother Nature deserves some appreciation.

1. Start a pledge board at work or at school. Use a whiteboard or provide a pad of Post-its for people to record their environmental pledges for the year. Ask friends and co-workers to make small changes — “I won’t leave the water running while I brush my teeth,” or “I will turn the lights off when I leave a room” — and then to post those pledges for all to see. Working together boosts accountability!

Accountability
Accountability

2. Attend an Earth Day fair. You’ll get the chance to test environmentally friendly products, eat locally grown food and chat with people who are making a difference when it comes to the environment.

Clean Environment
Clean Environment

 

3. Get plugged into a group. Joining an environmental group is one of the best ways to get involved in the global cleanup effort. Make a donation, put in some volunteer hours, or simply learn about the environment.

Just do it
Just do it

4. Make a recycling plan. Know what you can and cannot recycle, and start separating out those cans and bottles, Bags, plastics, paper!

Put Recycle by the curb
Put Recycle by the curb

 

5. Fix those leaky faucets. Drip, drip, DROP. You’ve put off repairing that leaky faucet project for some time now. Make a beeline for the hardware store! Only 1 percent of Earth’s water is drinkable, and our supply is slowly running out. Any should prompt you to stop wasting water and fix those leaks.

Drip Drop
Drip Drop
Leaky Faucets
Leaky Faucets

6. Plant a tree. Simple. Effective. Easy.  or Grow a Garden see #11

Plant Trees
Plant Trees

 

7. Give up bottled water. Bottled water consumes huge amounts of fossil fuels to produce and transport, and most of those recyclable water bottles end up in landfills. Get yourself a refillable and permanent water bottle to carry with you. You’ll save money on the cost of all those water bottles, too!

Bottled Water
Bottled Water

8. Start buying local. Locally grown food is easier on the environment. You’re also supporting local farmers, and they’ll thank you for it!

Buy Locally
Buy Locally

9. Go paperless. Bills come in many forms — mostly on paper. But many bill-paying services offer an option to pay online. Make a point to go paperless.

Go Paperless
Go Paperless

10. Make a birdhouse. Birdhouses can be installed around schoolyards or even sold to raise money at an environmental fundraiser.

Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy
Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy

11. Make a play garden. This is a space for kids to get their hands dirty. You can help them plant various flowers, vegetables and more. They’ll love watching them grow and tasting the fruits of their labour.

Grow a Garden
Grow a Garden

12. Write a letter to your local representative. Reaching out to elected officials and voicing your concerns over local environmental issues is one of the best ways to have your voice heard.

Let your voice be heard
Let your voice be heard

13. Organize a community cleanup. Get a group together to clean up your local park, schoolyard or beach.

Clean up after
Clean up after

14. Walk or take  Public Transportation to school. It keeps you out of the car, and it’s great exercise!

Go for walks
Go for walks

Sources:

Wikipedia,Forest Stewardship, International business and times

Thanking you all in advance

Graceful Cleaning
Graceful Cleaning

Sincerely

Yours

Conversationalist, Steward, Photographer,

Doug Worrall

DW Photography

London Ontario, Canada

Ecology Meanders In Nature Hamilton

Ecology Meanders In Nature Hamilton

Wednesday 20 April 2011

Meanders in nature

“Oh the river that meanders suggests a valley with low slope: As it twists and turns and cuts a course…an aquatic king of grope; For the river, twisty, twisty river, looks a bit like some blue rope.”

Sand Sediment

Kenton M. Steward

River and Stream Bends Work

The meander is one of several interesting shapes that form exquisite patterns found repeatedly in nature ! Meander is a bend in a sinuous (channel type) watercourse. All streams (rivers, creeks) are sinuous at some time in their geological history over some part of their length. Over time, rivers of water form into a shape called a meander as they wear away at the soil along the edges which are viewable from the ground level or from an airplane window. A river can have concave or convex banks. A meander is meander geometry or planform geometry with irregular waveforms or a sincuous waves (one thick line on the stream or river). The direction of the river usually meanders down a low valley on its axis. The curvature of the meandering stream varies from the apex (maximum point) to zero at a crossing point (straight line) which can be called inflection basically due to the curvature changing direction in that vicinity. In ancient Greek, the term was Maiandros or Maeander was meant for the Meander River which is east of ancient Greece in the town of Miletus which is today Milet, Turkey. Rivers rarely maintain a straight route as they travel to large rivers, lakes or oceans. Therefore, they take a series of bends and smooth loops that snake across the landscape.

Meandering streams

Sediment

This snaking pattern goes back and forth across a low valley (like Dundas Valley) because a stream, creek or river that may assume a meandering course, alternatively eroding sediments from the outside (shoreline) of a bend and deposit them on the inside. The meander is formed when moving water in a river, creek or stream erodes the outer banks and widens in the low valley. It is the bending of the river that is known as a meander. These bends reflect the way in which a river minimizes resistance to flow, therefore, spreading as evenly as possible along the river course the energy of the water. This is how it works: if you try to swim a meandering river one observation would be the velocity of the moving water was not the same everywhere you swam. That is because the velocity is at the lowest point along the bed and walls of the river ultimately due to the water as it encounters the most friction and therefore the flow of the water is reduced. In a straight channel segment of the river. creek or stream the water moves faster in mid-channel especially near the surface. But , as the water moves around the bend (meanders) the high velocity of the water swings to the outside of the channel. It is when water rushes past the outer part of the bend (meander), the sediment is continuously eroded from the riverbed and is swept downstream. On the innerside of each bend it is a slower flow of water and coarse sediment that accumulates and forms distinctive point bars. This creates a meandering pattern along the course of the river with shallow water and point bars on the inside bends and steep banks on the outside. The material lining of the banks is not uniform along the river system therefore another landform – an oxbow lake, can develop. It is the resistant sediment that slows downstream and other meanders on the same river that mitigate through softer sediment upstream as they intersect the slower-moving meander and cut off the channel between the two forming an independent loop that will become a lake (oxbow). Lake Ontario has many example of meanders. For example, Hamilton Harbour, a harbour or river bar is a sediment deposit formed at the harbour entrance or river mouth by the deposition of sediment or the action of waves on the sea floor.

Hamilton Lake Ontario

 

In Lake Ontario, the separation is the barrier beach (Burlington Bay in the east of Hamilton). The meanders are from a drowned river in glacier times of the lake. But, in the west end of Hamilton the river mouth spreads into a River Mouth Marsh (Cootes Paradise). This is fed by the Spencer Creek Watershed that include the following Creeks : Fletch, Flamborough, Logie’s, Westover, West Spencer, Ancaster, Borer’s Chedoke, Spring, Tiffny, Sulphur, Sydenham and Westdale. M.R. Pozze, J.J. Bryers and W.A. Morris from McMaster University School of Geography and Geology published a paper entitled “Lake-based magnets mapping of contaminated sediment distributing it on Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario, Canada.” These researchers investigated three concepts, namely: (1) Contaminated Sediment, (2) Environmental magnetism, and (3) Magnetic susceptibility. Other Lake Ontario meanders include: Hyland Creek River near Scarborough that flows into Lake Ontario; the Humber River that flows south into Lake Ontario; and, Keating Channel that empties into Toronto Harbourfront and Lake Ontario. Hamilton’s Cycling Paths are also noted for their meandering paths.

Meandering paths

Other Meanderings

Architectural meander

Greek and Roman art, especially Greek vases from the Geometric Period have ocean-like patterns of waves. In art and architecture repeated motifs are shaped from a continuous line into a decorative boarder called meanderings. In protecting our Canadian environment an ocean going yacht and coastal cruiser called Meander is a historical ship. That is, because in 1977 the ship Meander acted as Greenpeace IX stopping supertankers from coming into British Columbia waters at Vancouver. In Greenpeace IX, the ship Meander was a blockade to nuclear submarines attempting to enter Hood Canal. It also served in FY11 in WW11. In the 1950s and 1960s it was a coastal cruiser on the west coast of Vancouver Island. In 2,005 at the Victoria Classic Boat Show it won “Best Boat Of The Show” award. The original owner George Kidd, wanted a ship that would go anywhere in the world.

Hamilton Meandering sky

Sources: Canadian Geographic Magazine; McMaster University School of Geography and Geology; Royal Vancouver Yacht Club;

 

By Jacqueline

Doug Worrall Photographer




Waterfowl Conservation is Ecologically Invaluable

Waterfowl Conservation is Ecologically Invaluable

Monday April 4 2011

Goose feeding on vegitation

 

The importance of Birds is not just contained in their visible and valuable components of biodiversity ! Their importance lies in the fact that they are representatives of Ecological Health. And, Birds inspire an Ecological Approach to Conservation. The operative word here it “TO.” Bird Conservation is a field in the Science of Conservation in Biology related to threatened birds. From a socio-economic perspective, birds and their migrations have motivated incredible international co-operation, which for waterfowl has translated into millions of $ in wetland habitat conservation efforts across the continent. Birds link us to the natural world every day – even in the most urban settings. Birds keep our ecosystems running smoothly by controlling rodents and insect pests, scavenging wastes and pollinating plants. The truth is that healthy bird populations suggest healthy habitats for all species. Of the 431 species of Canadian Breeding Birds, 9% are Waterfowl, 18% are Waterbirds, and 10% are Shorebirds. Currently one in eight of the world’s birds are threatened with global extinction, and of the 431 bird species that regularly breed in Canada, 60 are classified as at risk. In waterfowl, there are 35 species of ducks, geese and swans that spend at least part of each year in Canada.

Mallard duck

 

The recruitment and morality rates of waterfowl vary in response to weather, climate, habitat loss, competition for resources, environmental contamination and other factors, and these factors also pertain to other species. However, waterfowl differ from most other bird populations in being subject to mortality from hunting. The Institute for Wetland and Waterfowl Research (WWR) is the scientific research arm of Ducks Unlimited Canada. Some species of sea-ducks, continue to experience long-term declines. But, in contrast, Snow Geese have become so abundant that they may endanger other wild life through their effects on habitat. April is a great time to look for migrating shorebirds, which can be seen on shallow wetlands, like Cootes Paradise Wetland (formerly Dundas Marsh). Given that Waterfowl cover only 9% of Canada’s 431 Breeding Birds, efforts for waterfowl conservation are expanding to include all birds. The North American Bird conservation Initiative is about this expansion.

Ducks heading north
Ducks in Cootes Paradise

In the early 1900s, North American birds were at risk from unregulated hunting pressures and marketing. The response to this was the 1916 Migratory Bird Treaties between Canada and U.S., and in 1936 between U.S. and Mexico. In the 1980s (30 years ago) Waterfowl populations declined so drastically due to habitat loss (drought) in Western Canada, that an international response was initiated to protect wetland and upland habitats – critical for Waterfowl populations and survival. This resulted in the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP). The present status of many Waterfowl species is very good, with populations at or near the international goals agreed to under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP). Part of the success of (NAWMP) continues to be facilitated by legislation in the U.S. that enables millions of U.S. $ into Canada (to be matched) for wetland associated upland conservation.

Soon to fly north

 

Based on the history of co-operation, conservationists from Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, along with the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation worked together to develop the response – the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI). the (NABCI) vision is populations and habitats of North America’s birds protected, restored and enhanced through co-ordinated efforts at international, national, regional and local levels, guided by sound science and effective management. The (NABCI) goal is to deliver the full spectrum of Bird Conservation through regionally based, biologically driven, landscape-oriented partnerships. The Canadian (NABCI) Model includes: NAWMP (Wetlands, Waterfowl), Partners In Flight (Uplands, Landbirds), Shorebird Plan (WHSRN sites, Shorebirds), Wings over Water (Waterbirds) for an integrated action plan and joint venture delivery system in a co-ordinated approach to Bird Conservation. This developed formed 67 Bird Conservation Regions (BCR) across the continent. Canada’s BCRs tend to be larger than the others, and orient themselves on an east-west basis, crossing many jurisdictions. For example, Ontario’s Boreal Forest BCR 8 has the highest breeding landbirds at one billion; and the Non-Boreal Forest BCR 12 has 40 million breeding birds using this landscape.

Canadian geese in flight
Canadian geese

 

So how does NABCI work at BCR level ? Basically, it determines biological and strategic priorities and population goals for species – waterfowl, landbirds, shorebirds, waterbirds. Bill Lamond said abut the Hamilton Fall Bird Count taken on the last day in the count window (Nov. 7th, 2,010) that “it produced at total of 126 species the lowest total since 2,00 when 125 species were recorded…I was expecting a fairly high species total in the range of 140+ species as there had not been any intense cold weather to push lingering birds out.” Although the results were disappointing, but there were great highlights, like the Purple Sandpiper spotted on the rocks at Fifty Point, Grimsby on Lake Ontario. And, the Semipalmated Sandpiper was documented in 2,010 at Dundas Marsh (Cootes Paradise), Windermere Basin in Hamilton Harbourfront, the Red Hill Expressway and QEW Stormwater Pond, and Campbellville Road. and Millboroug Line. The Common Loon, one was spotted off LaSalle Marina, seven off Sioux Lookout Park, six at Shoracres, 5 at Burloak Park, and one at Bronte Harbour. There were two nests of Red-necked Grebes at Bronte Harbour with eggs, and 13 Red-necked Grebes at Spencer Smith Park in Burlington. The Green Heron was spotted at the Windermere Basin in Hamilton Harbour and a pair were at a nest at the Millgrove Loam Pits.

Mute swan hamilton

“You have to believe in happiness, Or happiness never comes…, Ah, that’s the reason a bird can sing – On his darkest day he believes in Spring.” by Douglas Mallock

Waterfowl conservation

Source: North American Bird Conservation Initiative by Brigitte Collins, Eastern Habitat Joint venture Canadian Wildlife Service Ontario Region; April Birding; Nature Canada; Environment Canada; the Wood Duck

Woodland duck

 

 

By Jacqueline

 

Doug Worrall Photography