Tag Archives: MODIFIED

Humans Contribute to the Greenhouse Effect

Humans Contribute to the Greenhouse Effect

Sunday March 25 2011

Greenhouse Gas

Many greenhouse gases occur naturally, such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone. Others such as hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) result exclusively from human industrial processes.

What Causes the Greenhouse Effect?
Life on earth depends on energy from the sun. About 30 percent of the sunlight that beams toward Earth is deflected by the outer atmosphere and scattered back into space. The rest reaches the planet’s surface and is reflected upward again as a type of slow-moving energy called infrared radiation.

The heat caused by infrared radiation is absorbed by “greenhouse gases” such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, ozone and methane, which slows its escape from the atmosphere.

Although greenhouse gases make up only about 1 percent of the Earth’s atmosphere, they regulate our climate by trapping heat and holding it in a kind of warm-air blanket that surrounds the planet.

This phenomenon is what scientists call the “greenhouse effect.” Without it, scientists estimate that the average temperature on Earth would be colder by approximately 30 degrees Celsius (54 degrees Fahrenheit), far too cold to sustain our current ecosystem.

 

Greenhouse gasses

How Do Humans Contribute to the Greenhouse Effect?
While the greenhouse effect is an essential environmental prerequisite for life on Earth, there really can be too much of a good thing.

The problems begin when human activities distort and accelerate the natural process by creating more greenhouse gases in the atmosphere than are necessary to warm the planet to an ideal temperature.

  • Burning natural gas, coal and oil -including gasoline for automobile engines-raises the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
  • Some farming practices and land-use changes increase the levels of methane and nitrous oxide.
  • Many factories produce long-lasting industrial gases that do not occur naturally, yet contribute significantly to the enhanced greenhouse effect and “global warming” that is currently under way.
  • Deforestation also contributes to global warming. Trees use carbon dioxide and give off oxygen in its place, which helps to create the optimal balance of gases in the atmosphere. As more forests are logged for timber or cut down to make way for farming, however, there are fewer trees to perform this critical function.
  • Population growth is another factor in global warming, because as more people use fossil fuels for heat, transportation and manufacturing the level of greenhouse gases continues to increase. As more farming occurs to feed millions of new people, more greenhouse gases enter the atmosphere.

Ultimately, more greenhouse gases means more infrared radiation trapped and held, which gradually increases the temperature of the Earth’s surface and the air in the lower atmosphere.

 

 

A photograph is usually looked at – seldom looked into.  ~Ansel Adams

 

where should-it go

“I think a photography class should be a requirement in all educational programs because it makes you see the world rather than just look at it. ” Unknown author

 

Swirling smoke

 

 

There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs. ~Ansel Adams

 

 

Doug Worrall Photographer

Happy Halloween Trick or treats

Happy Halloween Trick or treats
Sunday October 31 2010

My Cat


Trick or Treat
It’s Halloween boys and ghouls
Do your tricks and treats, but don’t be cruel
Dress up like ghosts and witches and scare
Paint your faces and boo up your hair

A beautiful princess or a fairy with wings
I saw a deck of cards, a king and a queen
A parade of children dressed up like creatures  of the night
Going door to door filling those who open with  fright

I remember those days when I was young
Trick or treating, was lots of fun
Loading up on candy and treats
Staying up all night running the streets

Bats and Black Cats

cat crazy
A friend of mine once said,
bats are little rats with wings.
If that is true, then black cats do
love those little flying things.
They flit and flutter one way and another,
in the night sky, across the moon,
but only the cat can catch them
with one magic leap and it’s the poor bat’s doom.
she brings it to the witch’s house,
for some secret recipe — but if the cat
should miss, and the lucky bat flutters away,
our furry friend finds another place
that night to fall asleep.
Doug Worrall Photography

Mute Swans There Role in Culture

Mute Swans There Role in Culture
Tuesday September 28th 2010
Role in culture

Mute swans "Cob" and "Pen"

Many of the cultural aspects refer to the Mute Swan of Europe. Perhaps the best known story about a swan is The Ugly Duckling fable. The story centres around a duckling who is mistreated until it becomes evident he is a swan and is accepted into the habitat. He was mistreated because real ducklings are, according to many, more attractive than a cygnet, yet cygnets become swans, which are very attractive creatures. Swans are often a symbol of love or fidelity because of their long-lasting monogamous relationships. See the famous swan-related operas “Lohengrin” and “Parsifal”. In the Irish legend “The Wooing of Etain”, the king of the Sidhe (subterranean-dwelling, supernatural beings) transforms himself and the most beautiful woman in Ireland, Etain, into swans to escape from the king of Ireland and Ireland’s armies.

Swans feature strongly in mythology. In Greek mythology, the story of Leda and the Swan recounts that Helen of Troy was conceived in a union of Zeus disguised as a swan and Leda, Queen of Sparta. Other references in classical literature include the belief that upon death the otherwise silent Mute Swan would sing beautifully – hence the phrase swan song; as well as Juvenal’s sarcastic reference to a good woman being a “rare bird, as rare on earth as a black swan,” from which we get the Latin phrase “rara avis,” rare bird.

The Irish legend of the Children of Lir is about a stepmother transforming her children into swans for 900 years. The swan has recently been depicted on an Irish commemorative coin.

In Norse mythology, there are two swans that drink from the sacred Well of Urd in the realm of Asgard, home of the gods. According to the Prose Edda, the water of this well is so pure and holy that all things that touch it turn white, including this original pair of swans and all others descended from them. The poem “Volundarkvida”, or the “Lay of Volund”, part of the Poetic Edda, also features swan maidens.

In the Finnish epic Kalevala, a swan lives in the Tuoni river located in Tuonela, the underworld realm of the dead. According to the story, whoever killed a swan would perish as well. Jean Sibelius composed the “Lemminkäinen Suite” based on Kalevala, with the second piece entitled “Swan of Tuonela” “(Tuonelan joutsen)”. Today, five flying swans are the symbol of the Nordic Countries and the whooper swan (“Cygnus cygnus”) is the national bird of Finland.

In Latin American literature, the Nicaraguan poet Ruben Darío (1867-1916) consecrated the swan as a symbol of artistic inspiration by drawing attention to the constancy of swan imagery in Western culture, beginning with the rape of Leda and ending with Wagner’s “Lohengrin”. Darío’s most famous poem in this regard is “Blasón – “Coat of Arms” (1896), and his use of the swan made it a symbol for the Modernismo poetic movement that dominated Spanish language poetry from the 1880s until the First World War. Such was the dominance of Modernismo in Spanish language poetry that the Mexican poet Enrique González Martínez attempted to announce the end of Modernismo with a sonnet provocatively entitled, “Tuércele el cuello al cisne – “Wring the Swan’s Neck” (1910).

Swans are revered in many religions and cultures, especially Hinduism. The Sanskrit word for swan is “hamsa” or “hansa”, and it is the vehicle of many deities like the goddess Saraswati. It is mentioned several times in the Vedic literature, and persons who have attained great spiritual capabilities are sometimes called Paramahamsa (“Great Swan”) on account of their spiritual grace and ability to travel between various spiritual worlds. In the Vedas, swans are said to reside in the summer on Lake Manasarovar and migrate to Indian lakes for the winter, eat pearls, and separate milk from water in a mixture of both. Hindu iconography typically shows the Mute Swan. It is wrongly supposed by many historians that the word “hamsa” only refers to a goose, since today swans are no longer found in India, not even in most zoos. However, ornithological checklists clearly classify several species of swans as vagrant birds in India.

Reflections of Love

The ballet “Swan Lake” by Pyotr Tchaikovsky is considered among both the most important works of this composer and among the often-performed classics of ballet. It is partially based on an ancient German legend, which tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer’s curse – to which were added similar elements from Russian Russian folk tales [ such as The White Duck collected by Alexander Nikolayevich Afanasyev in Narodnye russkie skazki ] . Some major elements (girls turned to swans and living in a lake, and a hero falling in love with one of them) are also shared by the Irish Mythology story of Caer Ibormeith.

Photographer

Doug Worrall