Tag Archives: Mother Nature

Stewardship, Conservation And You

Stewardship, Conservation,  Nature and YOU

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle

2016/06/30

Let us all join hands and try to make a difference

Sunrise
Sunrise

(We can divide the value that our Land have for us into three general categories: economic, ecological, and social.)

invasive plant, insect, and disease species, the need to sequester carbon, development, and so on. The need in our province for forest stewardship—wise care of and considerate use—is pressing.

Invasive
Invasive

Recycling and reusing aren’t just for hippies and environmentalists nor is it redundant .The message is that good stewardship is an agenda we can all get behind. Small changes can make a difference at a time when our planet needs a hand.

The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice
The planet needs our hand SUMMER Solstice

 

Humans haven’t always taken good care of Mother Nature. In the past 50 years, we’ve consumed more natural resources than in all previous history combined, according to my  Sources.

Between 1905 and 2005, global oil consumption grew eightfold, production of metals increased by 600 percent, and natural resource extraction grew by 50 percent. Today, more than 100 billion pieces of junk mail get delivered in the U.S. alone — that’s about 848 pieces per household.

WASTE
WASTE

 

Because of the burning of fossil fuels, there is now more carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere than at any other time in the last 800,000 years, according to most scientists. Increased carbon has been the driving force behind global warming, which affects nearly every ecosystem, large and small.

Fossil Fuels and YOU
Fossil Fuels and YOU

Scientists say it’s time we cleaned up our act. What better way to make a positive change . Here are 14 ways to commemorate the Earth, because Mother Nature deserves some appreciation.

1. Start a pledge board at work or at school. Use a whiteboard or provide a pad of Post-its for people to record their environmental pledges for the year. Ask friends and co-workers to make small changes — “I won’t leave the water running while I brush my teeth,” or “I will turn the lights off when I leave a room” — and then to post those pledges for all to see. Working together boosts accountability!

Accountability
Accountability

2. Attend an Earth Day fair. You’ll get the chance to test environmentally friendly products, eat locally grown food and chat with people who are making a difference when it comes to the environment.

Clean Environment
Clean Environment

 

3. Get plugged into a group. Joining an environmental group is one of the best ways to get involved in the global cleanup effort. Make a donation, put in some volunteer hours, or simply learn about the environment.

Just do it
Just do it

4. Make a recycling plan. Know what you can and cannot recycle, and start separating out those cans and bottles, Bags, plastics, paper!

Put Recycle by the curb
Put Recycle by the curb

 

5. Fix those leaky faucets. Drip, drip, DROP. You’ve put off repairing that leaky faucet project for some time now. Make a beeline for the hardware store! Only 1 percent of Earth’s water is drinkable, and our supply is slowly running out. Any should prompt you to stop wasting water and fix those leaks.

Drip Drop
Drip Drop
Leaky Faucets
Leaky Faucets

6. Plant a tree. Simple. Effective. Easy.  or Grow a Garden see #11

Plant Trees
Plant Trees

 

7. Give up bottled water. Bottled water consumes huge amounts of fossil fuels to produce and transport, and most of those recyclable water bottles end up in landfills. Get yourself a refillable and permanent water bottle to carry with you. You’ll save money on the cost of all those water bottles, too!

Bottled Water
Bottled Water

8. Start buying local. Locally grown food is easier on the environment. You’re also supporting local farmers, and they’ll thank you for it!

Buy Locally
Buy Locally

9. Go paperless. Bills come in many forms — mostly on paper. But many bill-paying services offer an option to pay online. Make a point to go paperless.

Go Paperless
Go Paperless

10. Make a birdhouse. Birdhouses can be installed around schoolyards or even sold to raise money at an environmental fundraiser.

Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy
Make a Birdhouse Jump for Joy

11. Make a play garden. This is a space for kids to get their hands dirty. You can help them plant various flowers, vegetables and more. They’ll love watching them grow and tasting the fruits of their labour.

Grow a Garden
Grow a Garden

12. Write a letter to your local representative. Reaching out to elected officials and voicing your concerns over local environmental issues is one of the best ways to have your voice heard.

Let your voice be heard
Let your voice be heard

13. Organize a community cleanup. Get a group together to clean up your local park, schoolyard or beach.

Clean up after
Clean up after

14. Walk or take  Public Transportation to school. It keeps you out of the car, and it’s great exercise!

Go for walks
Go for walks

Sources:

Wikipedia,Forest Stewardship, International business and times

Thanking you all in advance

Graceful Cleaning
Graceful Cleaning

Sincerely

Yours

Conversationalist, Steward, Photographer,

Doug Worrall

DW Photography

London Ontario, Canada

Sailing A Meditative Connect With Mother Nature

Sailing A  Meditative Connect With Mother Nature Hamilton

All Ages "catch the breeze"

A State of Mind Meditation

Monday March 7 2011

Come Sail Away

“Meditation to connect with Mother Nature at the Hamilton Harbourfront”

Summer Still

Most boaters choose a life on the water because they feel a kinship with the marine world and some tend to use it as a form of  Meditation to connect with Mother Nature at the Hamilton Harbourfront. Here, the sailor in his or her meditation touch base with their inner self using the calming effect of the waterfront where the environment is the atmosphere of Lake Ontario. And, the sailors must develop an awareness of their damaging footprints on the landscape ! Therefore, Dieter Loibner, an Australian yachting journalist in the U.S. book title says it all: “Sustainable Sailing.” This book addresses the increasing impact of sailing on the environment and explains how sailors can be a positive force for change. Sustainable use of our coastal inland Lake Ontario can be assisted by (1) removing any plant, fish, animal matter and mud by draining water from the craft and equipment; (2) be aware when cleaning their craft detergents many contain phosphates which are pollutants and cause oxygen depletion’s that leads to suffocation of aquatic life; (3) boat exhaust emissions – carbon monoxid , hydracarbons (such as motoring yachts) , nitrogen oxides – are harmful to both marine life and the planet; (5 ) by being respectful of waterfowl and slowing down upon approach, (6) Waste and sewage are a problem and rule of thumb is to dump them at marine facilities. Furthermore, cruise ships impact our sailing environment as they dump 210,000 gallons of sewage weekly, which is not sustainable sailing. Enjoyment of sailing depends on HIGH QUALITY WATER ENVIRONMENT which can only be maintained and protected by the collective effort of sailors and the marine industry to avoid the environmental impacts of sailing by using “Sustainable Sailing” procedures.

Inpact on water quality
Practicing proper disposal high priority

 

On a lovely sunny morning, the north-east wind was already strongly blowing white horses (whitecaps) on the waves in Hamilton Harbour that seemed refreshing. I was watching my friends in a Harbour race boat, a Mahogany Hull Boat, a nice teak wood chestnut-colour that almost reminds you of horses. The secret of these race boats is the Bow being V-shaped rather than U-shaped which made them lift out of the water and ‘plane’ along the top of the water, whenever the wind was strongly blowing. Sail boats have ‘planed’ for many years, like a ‘lift and go.’ Archaeologists tell us the first sign of ‘Sailing Ships’ appeared in Egypt or Mesopotamia around 3,500 B.C. The Egyptians also used “sailing ships”( or, Padao – a type of Indian sail boat ) to transport people and their goods around the Nile River. The Vikings took their place in the Atlantic Ocean with 80 ft. wide and 70 m. long :Long Boats. The sailor’s ‘playing field’ of wind and water is constantly changing, which is unlike other sports. Sailing is harnessing the power of Mother Nature ! And, sailors need a healthy respect for her power ! The wind changes strength and direction while waves or currents change the water. The wind rules a sailboat sailor’s universe; it is the alpha and omega of sailing. Sailing then is using the windpower to move the sails. Any sailboat can hit the Eye of the Wind at a point where the wind blows directly to the observer, sometimes it is called Eyebolt. The Bow of the boat can be turned away from the Eye of the Wind, termed “Bearing Away.” You may have heard Movie Stars use that term on a ship. Or, by use of the “Jibe” the Stern can be turned so the sailboat (or yacht) crosses through the Eye of the Wind. By Jibing, it changes the side of the sailboat that the sails are carried (this is opposite of Tacking). In Jibing the sailboat goes into and across the flow of the wind. Here, the sail empties of wind on one side and the Boom swings gently across the boat and the sail fills up with wind on the other side.

 

Historically First Nations Canadian Indians who lived in villages around Hamilton Harbour on the west-end of Lake Ontario named it “Macassa Bay” meaning ‘beautiful water.’ The Sailing Clubs historically and currently are basically available to people with lavish lifestyles, not the average working person ! Membership to exclusive yacht clubs including their lounges and bars have been viewed extravagant packages during a time of economic challenge in our country today. Yet, people do sail, and Hamilton Harbour provides unique geography providing shelter for the beginner and interesting winds for the seasoned sailor of RHYC, Macassa Bay Yacht Club, Leander Boat Club and Sailing School. The first Royal Hamilton Yacht Club (RHYC) was built in the 1860s and the current clubhouse was built in 1915, after the WW1 fire in 1915. The name “Royal” was not attached to this Hamilton Yacht Club until it was granted by Queen Victoria of England and the Commonwealth. Today, Prince Charles is RHYC’s patron. Following Prince Charles naval pursuits are his brother Prince Andrew and his son Prince William ( who has served Navy, Air Force and Army). The coveted Prince of Wales Cup Race is termed a Championship and the winning team members are Champions winning the Water-Jug Trophy. In Hamilton, in 1896, the boat Zelina captured the coveted Prince of Wales Cup. In small boat sailing circles this Prince Of Wales Cup is raced for in other countries. For example, Sir Peter Scott and his crew in 1937 entered the race at Lowestoft, England. Until that time, the wooden masts of sail boats were varnished, then they changed to aluminum. Their boat was called Thunder, a 14 foot thoroughbred built with precision and artistry of a violin. They narrowly on this 4th attempt won the Prince of Wales Cup just 16 seconds ahead of the 46 competitors. And, in 1952, one of this crew went on to win the Olympic Silver Medal in a single-handed class in Helsinki. Today, yacht clubs also run various Regattas in sailboat races. It is interesting that a book entitled – In The Eye Of The Wind – the forward is written by Prince Charles. This book is about the experiences of two young sailors and explorers during the Operation Drake 1979 – 1980. This book is not about the flagship Eye of the Wind ! But, the Eye of the Wind flagship is a beautiful Brigantine (tall ships) boat which is still in service after 99 years at sea. Today, the customers pay for its fuel and maintenance, and the stories have changed from adventurous to sightseeing and historical voyages. There is today The Toronto Brigantine: Tall Ship Adventures for youth run in Summer Training Programs. The name Brigantine comes from the Italian word Brigantino meaning Pirate Ships. As Long John Silver aptly said: “Shiver Me Timbers ! ” Brigantine is a two-masted sailing ship with square rigging, sometimes called hermaphrodite brigs , or, brig-schooners. The term Brigantine originated with two masted ships powered by oars on which pirates, or sea brigards, terrorized the Mediterranean in the 16th Century. But, in Northern Europe Brigantines became purely a sailing ship. At Port Dover on Lake Erie just one hour south of Hamilton, there was a Brigantine (Tall Ship) on display in 2,009. Hamilton Public Library’s Archives has many photos and postcards of Schooners and Brigantines in the early years of Hamilton Harbour which are well worth taking the time to look at their unique sails..

Hamilton Sailing Clubs
Using Gas power plenty of wind?

In Wetlands the water can be very shallow, depending on drainage and rainfall. Here a different boat is utilized sometimes called a Dinghy Boat with two oars on the side. In the mid twentieth century especially in England sailors and hunters used Black Boats. Their name came from the tar and pitch material used to make them watertight. A favourite boat was called a Jolly Boat for racing because of its speed and fun. In Hamilton Harbour sailing occurs all year round as in winter Ice-Boating is very popular. The Ice-Boat is powered by wheels and the wind of the sail. This year is a bumper crop of ice, so ice-boaters are enjoying a long season. Down the road  is Peterborough famous for their Peterborough Canoes. We are fortunate to have beautiful water (Hamilton Harbour) at the northern end of our city on the western-tip of Lake Ontario. As Sir Peter Scott said when he came to Canada to race in the Prince Of Wales Race: ” There were new problems and new skills to be acquired; as Lake Ontario is thirty miles wide at Toronto, and being freshwater it can provide a shorter, steeper, nastier sea than you will find anywhere on salt water.” Therefore, you do not have to travel the world to encounter a challenge while sailboating or yachting. No matter what ‘sailing ship’ you plan to use in Hamilton Harbour this Spring to Fall season you can be sure you will be – Slip, Sliding Away – by using “Sustainable Sailing ” procedures over Hamilton Harbour’s “Macassa Bay , or, beautiful waters.

Boating Cootes Paradise
Morning calm

Source: One Hundred Years and Still Sailing; In The Eye of the Wind, young explorers; Eye of the Wind, Peter Scott; Sustainable Sailing

By Jacqueline

 

Doug Worrall Photographer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

The GIFT Harbourfront Trail and Mother Nature Hamilton

The GIFT Harbourfront Trail and Mother Nature Hamilton

Sunday, December 20 2010

 


 


The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched – they must be felt with the heart. ~Helen Keller ~

Beauty is not in the face; beauty is a light in the heart ~ Kahlil Gibran~

The Summer of 2010 was the best year of my life. Losing a family member, but gaining twenty unique relationships.

Deciding to purchase a nikond90 with the money my mother left me and an electric bike resulted in the most unforgettable Summer Vacation.  10,000 images taken

The Hamilton  Harbourfront Park and the Trail ends at Princess Point  which has been my destination every morning for the last 6 months. The Diversity of wildlife and scenery are a Photographers paradise, Cootes Paradise and the RBG fish-way are the centre of my Journeys around this unique area.

The Diversity of people I met and befriended this year was amazing. Some I have not seen for a while, but many affected my life positively and are still in touch. People need Mother Nature in there life, They seek-out  Fresh air, exercise and the relaxation it offers.a great place to run into old friends, and meet new people just like yourself.

This year I went fishing for a few Months and met many people there, Terry and Bill explained There tecniques to  fish for Rainbow trout and so began a relationship and comoradery .Terry will be fishing all Winter in Lake Ontario.

Terry- Fishing companion

At the pride festival I met someone from my building Kevin  and also helped The pride comitee to photograph the concert and b b que. click on the pride section to see those pictures.

Also met very nice students of Dr Banshee who are doing studies on goby fish in the great lakes. Look back here:  ARCHIVES   “Aggressive Aquatic Species Invading Great Lakes”  Monday August 11th 2010

Student counting goby fish

Each day I saw a man in a wooden kayak, and one day we talked and began a daily friendship, him on the water with me on land. Raffy built this kayak himself and is making another this Winter Raffy has invited me-out kayaking next Summer in this kayak as he will use his new one, “I accepted his invitation.

Man and his wooden kayak

“David is not like myself, We kept in communication each night by phone to meet the next day.Dave was very happy to learn photography as he kept-up around the trail on an electric wheelchair learning that when I need to get to a shot, he would stay in pursuit and keep his eyes open.

David watched for activity

And most important Jacqui,At first I knew her as  Beacon of nature and someone as fascinated with photography and Mother Nature as myself. .Jaqui wrote most of every post this Summer here at Doug Worrall Photography and has done some wonderful writing and is a great friend.That is why this post lacks in penmanship, grammar and flow

Cliff I met as he hooked into this 30 pound Carp.I helped him net the fish, weigh-it and release the fish alive.Cliff was a very nice fisherman. Archives “September 27 2010”

Cliff friendly fisherman
Jacqui-writer beacon of nature

To all My Friends, Family and people all over the World

Happy Holidays and we will meet again

because the draw of mother nature is too great, as our hearts and souls reach for peace.
Written by  Doug Worrall
Doug Worall Photography
Cold weather has hampered the travelling and seeing the trail mates. Only four months until spring, see you soon trail mates

Also back on the trail for a Winter wonderland post for your enjoyment by December 25

Sincerely

Doug Worrall