Tag Archives: SILENT SPRING

What Has Killed The Last Swan Hamilton

What Has Killed The Last Swan

Sunday July 10 2011

Pen Cob and now a dead Signet

 

 

“Where the swans nest, due to the higher water this year, there are many, maybe over populated by snapping turtles and Large Pike. There is always the likely-hood of a Snake-head fish, Raccoon’s and people being capable of killing a small Signet.The first two Signets to go missing was on Fathers Day, and the last one over this Weekend, Coincidence, No such thing.”

Signets ready to swim-only one survives
Bleak Future for the nesting swans in Hamilton

 

As a photographer that specializes in Mute Swans I feel like there is a Silent Spring ” Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964)” happening Constantly. The lack of wildlife, plants has left many people with many questions including myself. This Weekend due to health Issues I  rented a car and have been travelling around parking lot too parking Lot. Today I hiked down the Harbourfront Trail and am not shocked to see the Gazebo Signets that were born in Harbourfront Park this Year only have one outta six Signets left, I did a Post “we are the last two Sister” on my other Blog http://betterphotos4you.com. The Last Signet to go Missing was very small compared to his Sister :See image below.

Signet Still alive much larger than other

 

Where the swans nest, due to the higher water this year, there are many, maybe over populated by snapping turtles and Large Pike. There is always the likely-hood of a Snake-head fish, Raccoon’s, people and there dog’s being capable of killing a small Signet.The first two Signets to go missing was on Fathers Day, and the last one over this Weekend, Coincidence, No such thing. One whole clutch born over by Macassa Yacht Club the  signets and pen and cob disappeared on the May 24th Weekend. A good source has told me that he has seen young parents allow there children to take turtles and signet’s home with them after spending a day in the Park, or, Harbourfront Trail, I have many images of these people, but legal issues does not give me the  authority to publish them.The Parents were in there early 20,s, both of which were fishing all day and not watching there children, I did, and have images of the children throwing rocks at the nesting swan, ripping flowers out of ground etc…., children without parents. I am not going to get into the whole social aspect of today’s society and dysfunctional families or the lack of a suitable “respect nature” mindset educational System. People please respect what Mother Nature has given you ……………………………………….

Cob busks every hour

By Doug Worrall

Easy To Be Hard

This Image taken June 10 2011

How can people be so heartless
How can people be so cruel
Easy to be hard, easy to be cold

Beautiful Mute Swan

How can people have no feelings
How can they ignore their friends
Easy to be proud, easy to say no

Beautiful Pen

Especially people who care about strangers
Who care about evil and social injustice
Do you only care about bleeding crowd
How about a needing friend, I need a friend

I NEED A FRIEND

How can people be so heartless
You know I’m hung up on you
Easy to be proud, easy to say no

The Lone Mute swan

 

Especially people who care about strangers
Who care about evil and social injustice
Do you only care about bleeding crowd
How about a needing friend, we all need a friend

We all need a friend

How can people be so heartless
How can people be so cruel
Easy to be proud, easy to say no
Easy to be cold, easy to say no
Come, on, easy to give in, easy to say no
Easy to be cold, easy to say no
Much too easy to say no

Much too easy for some to say "No"

Lyrics by Three Dog Night

The Mute Swan is in Danger of being removed from the protected species act, why? “E coli bacteria on the beach in Harbourfront Park”<<No one use’s>> Have they forgotten about the raw sewage,poison from industry they allow to drain into Cootes Paradise Marsh, and Hamilton Harbour.?

 

 

Doug Worrall Photographer

 

Changes in Food Web The Silent Spring

Changes in Lake Ontario Food Web

Changes in Food Web The Silent Spring

Sunday August 29th 2010

By Jacqueline Darby

Rachel Carson studied zoology and marine biology.  Her work on nature and environmental ethics, led to the global environmental movement.  Both The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Fish and Wildlife Service credit her as their founding inspiration.  In her 1962  book, Silent Spring, which was originally written as an article, she points our in Chapter 3 re: toxins.  She speaks of how small doses will accumulate in the human body, and that substance will with this propensity  will concentrate as one moves up the FOOD CHAIN.  Now, considering this, transform the toxin in nature on plants, soil, water and  the negative consequences for wildlife, birds, fish, amphibians that rely of the Food Web in the Food Chain. Her tirade against humankind’s attempt to use technology to dominate nature and the control of nature as a phrase conceived in arrogance, using Biology and Philosophy, the assumption was nature exists for the convenience of man. These assumptions infuriated this Environmentalist, and we can see the results in interfering with nature, such as, all the arguments over the development of Red Hill Valley and the consequences of flooding that area via the Red Hill Parkway,  Mercury  and PCBs in Hamilton Harbour, the PFOS toxin in Lake Trout, and all the plants, soil, water, wildlife, birds, fish and amphibians that depend upon this Food Web in the Food Chain.

A silent spring

Environmentalists in 2,007 pointed to the need for scientific tools to examine the vast disturbances and plan for future ecological disruptions in order to understand how the Great Lakes community structure and population dynamics respond to the changes in the food web. In 2,003 due to the success of LOTT (Lake Ontario Trophic Transfer) and LETT (Lake Erie Trophic Transfer) resulted in the development of the Lake Ontario Lower Aquatic Food Web Assessment (LOLA) and the Lake Huron Binational Partnership program.
Now, let’s enter a local “time capsule” back to 1995.  Here, we enter the RED HILL VALLEY, a large environmentally sensitive area located within the city limits of Hamilton.  In this valley, we find surprisingly a Diverse Ecosystem in spite of degradation for the past 50 years ( 1945 to 1995).  A substantial number of aquatic plants not reported prior were found in 1995.  Field and inventory work by the Hamilton Naturalist Club showed: 570 species of vascular plants; 18 species of fish; 15 reptiles and amphibians; 24 mammals; 78 breeding birds; 177 migrant birds; 45 butterflies and 136 moths.  Today, in 2,010, with this summer’s “extreme flooding” and run-off from the Red Hill Parkway it would be interesting to do a follow-up study to see how may species remain in this abundant food web.
Now let’s zoon forward in the “time capsule” to Tuesday August 24th, 2,010 regarding the Gulf of Mexico oil spill new research was published on line by Science journal. What is interesting is their report  that ” by increasing the surface area between oil and water, the disperants seem to have provided the deep-sea microbes greater access to this unusual food source. [Microbes, or microorganisms are the oldest form of lie on earth and a largely unseen world of living things by the naked human eye that support life processes].  So, BP’s oil spill has petroleum-eating bacteria which fits degradation rates, researchers found bacteria but no oil.  Furthermore, , 206 million gallons of oil has come ashore, some has sunk into bottom sediments, and a little is still a floating frother.  But the cloud of oil that drifted  for months with 1,219 metres below the surface underwater seems to have disappeared in the six weeks since the well was plugged.  Why ?  Microbes ?  What scientists feared, and it has not happened was severe depletion of oxygen as microbes consumed the oil.  A study published last week and this one find only a slight depletion of oxygen – which is good news.  This is a very unusual and very different view of aquatic food webs.
There is good algae and bad algae.  The University of Toronto, Dept. Zoology said “Benthic algae can contribute a large portion of primary production in the littoral zone of lakes are essential as an important food resource for benthic invertebrates. Algal pigments could provide a quick measure of the composition of benthic algal communities.  But, in 2,000 scientific  methods ignored the natural variability in thee algal pigment composition.  The addition of abiotic factors (light and nutrient content) into the analysis of pigment variability allows for additional explanations in changes in the food web.

Algae

Invertebrate and fish communities have changed in the food web structure.  Alterations include anthropogenic (man-made effects and processes from human activities) e.g. exotic species.  Dressienid “exotic invasive” mussel’s predominate current research studies.  Their impact include (1) decoupling total phosphorus and chlorophila a in western Lake Ontario (Hamilton Harbour) is consistent with grazing and filtration; (2) they interfere with burrowing animal activities; (3) PCBs increase; (4) they colonize on solid surfaces (water intake pipes); (5) And, furthermore, Dressienid mussels create “structural risks” such as colonizing and eating at iron fastenings in four submerged shipwrecks.
Another major contaminant for the food web for the fish community is Perfluroctane Sulfonates (PFOS) which has been at higher levels in Lake Trout.  Hamilton Harbour is noted for its higher mercury count in fish.  A 2,006 study by the University of Waterloo found 30 species of fish caught in Hamilton Harbour.  The fish were aged using otoliths to allow for interpretation of the impact of diet changes in the 19 most abundant species.
Who eats the fish ? Basically, the  birds and  waterfowl eat the fish. In 1993 Hamilton Harbour was studied by the National Ecosystem Program to identify primary foraging areas by Common Terns.  Trawl samplings captured Emerald Shiner and Alewifes.  The Common Tern delivered 6 fish species to their chicks.  A caution was issued that “management of the islands by Colonially-nesting Waterbirds (Terns) in Hamilton Harbour to prevent Ring-Billed Seagulls from taking over habitat designed for Common Tern species as this changes the food web.  In 2,010 some Common Terns were cited at La Salle Park in Burlington.
Rachel Carson vividly points to the life-cycle in the Food Web of a soil-based Ecosystem, such as Cootes Paradise, Hamilton Harbour, and Red Hill Valley and she points to the  potent synthetic toxins that have long -term consequences for both wildlife and hmans.  Therefore, in determining changes in Lake Ontario’s food web all of these factors need to be considered and researched.
HOPE YOU ENJOY THE PICTURES AND INFORMATION
Jacqueline